Science

Obama meets with 4 U.S. Nobel Prize laureates

WASHINGTON (Kyodo) -- U.S. President Barack Obama met with four U.S. winners of this year's Nobel prizes on Monday, and pledged to boost government aid in the field of scientific research. The event at the White House was not open to the pre...

  • Japan's resources

    Seabed offers brighter hope in rare-earth hunt

    TOKYO -- Mud rich in rare-earth metals in the seabed near an isolated Japanese coral atoll is widely distributed and not as deep as initially thought, researchers have discovered, increasing the possibility of commercial mining. Rare earths inclu...

  • Pacific bluefin tuna, American eel listed as endangered species

    TOKYO (Kyodo) -- The International Union for Conservation of Nature on Monday added Pacific bluefin tuna and American eel to its new "Red List" of species at risk of extinction. The Switzerland-based organization, known as the IUCN, said tho...

  • Japanese ministry to share Earth observation data with NASA

    TOKYO -- Japan's environment ministry and American space agency NASA will tackle global environmental issues together by sharing data from their Earth observation satellites. The collaboration, announced by the ministry Friday, is aimed at better...

  • Scientists slowly unmasking Ebola

    TOKYO -- Researchers are starting to get a better read on the Ebola virus, the deadly hemorrhagic fever that continues to plague West Africa. The good news: The prevailing view is that the infectiousness of the virus, or the ease with which it sp...

  • Terumo looking to provide regenerative heart treatment

    TOKYO -- Medical equipment maker Terumo is moving to commercialize a regenerative therapy for heart failure, providing a much less invasive alternative to transplants and other existing treatments. Terumo filed with the Health Ministry on Thursda...

  • Researchers raced ahead without fear

    TOKYO -- "It was a shining blue, and I was so excited that my hands trembled," Isamu Akasaki, professor at Meijo University, said of an experiment he conducted roughly 25 years ago in which a blue light-emitting diode glowed for the first time. ...

  • Japan dotted with volcanoes that could erupt at any time

    TOKYO -- The recent eruption of Mount Ontake, Japan's worst postwar volcanic disaster, provided graphic evidence of the threat posed by active volcanoes. Japan has 110 active volcanoes, some 7% of the world total. Active volcanoes are those that ...

  • New skin cancer treatment method devised using iPS cells

    TOKYO -- Research in Japan has created a method of using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells to treat malignant melanoma, a type of skin cancer. The method was devised by Tamihiro Kawakami, associate professor at St. Marianna University School o...

  • Ontake eruption shows holes in Japan's early-warning system

    TOKYO -- The recent eruption of Mount Ontake in central Japan highlights the difficulties of predicting major volcanic events, as the country's volcanoes enter a more active phase following a devastating earthquake in March 2011. The Sept. 27 eru...

  • Race to develop blue LEDs lit fire under research

    TOKYO -- Two Japanese companies competed fiercely to develop blue LEDs, fighting over patents at one point, but it was their desire to outdo that pushed them to improve their techniques and ultimately spawned a new industry. The three scientists ...

  • Nobel laureates to budding researchers: Follow your interests

    TOKYO -- The importance of perseverance and pursuing interests were among the insights shared by the three winners of this year's Nobel Prize in physics, who spoke with The Nikkei on Wednesday. In separate interviews, the trio discussed their tho...

  • Anger was Nobelist Nakamura's driving force

    SANTA BARBARA, California -- Shuji Nakamura was angry about how he was treated while studying in the U.S., and then about how he was treated by the culture of corporate Japan. So in his early days as a researcher, he channeled that energy into solvin...

  • EDITORIAL: Japan physicists Nobel win for blue LED should be inspiration for all

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for 2014 to three physicists from Japan -- Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura. The decision, which many had predicted for years, was made "for the invention...

  • Nobel Prize a testament to Japan's manufacturing prowess

    TOKYO -- Three Japanese scientists who pursued years of low-profile research dominated this year's Nobel Prize in physics. The recognition is a big nod to a country long grappling with an anemic economy. In recent years, mathematics-based theoret...

  • Nobel gold aside, Japan may need to rethink R&D strategy

    TOKYO -- Japan's recent focus on scientific research that promises immediate applications is raising concerns about stifling more low-profile studies that could lead to innovations over the long haul. Japan currently looks to the U.S. in shaping ...

  • Blue LEDs opened a new world in light

    TOKYO -- The breakthrough of blue LEDs was so significant in changing lighting technology that the scientists behind it were chosen as this year's recipients for the Nobel Prize in physics. Isamu Akasaki, professor at Meijo University, Hiroshi Am...

  • Japanese science extends streak of Nobel gold

    TOKYO -- Nineteen Japanese-born physicists, chemists and biologists have earned their fields' highest honor -- 14 of them since 2000 -- attesting to the country's strength in both basic and applied sciences. Japan now ranks fifth in Nobel laureat...

  • Japanese physicists win Nobel Prize for blue LEDs

    PARIS -- The Nobel Prize in physics will be awarded to Japanese physicists Isamu Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano as well as Japanese-born American Shuji Nakamura for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes, the Royal Swedish Academy of Scienc...

  • Nobel-winning scientist was Japanese salaryman who fought employer

    TOKYO (Dow Jones) -- One of the three scientists who won the Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday is well-known in Japan as a salaryman who fought back against his employer and won millions of dollars. Shuji Nakamura, now a professor at the Universit...