Science

Japanese researchers develop 30-minute Ebola test

TOKYO -- Researchers at Japan's Nagasaki University, in collaboration with Eiken Chemical, have developed a method that can detect the presence of the Ebola virus in just 30 minutes. The new method is simpler than the current one and can be used in p...

  • New hope for stopping Ebola in its tracks

    WASHINGTON -- Researchers are making headway with new drugs and vaccines that may help to contain the outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus in West Africa. A team led by scientists from the Public Health Agency of Canada has announced promising resu...

  • Redrawing animal kingdom genealogy brings fish closer to humans

    TOKYO -- The scientific taxonomy that classifies plants and animals has been shaken up over the past 20 years. Under new modes of classification, fish do not constitute a discrete category of animals apart from that of mammals. Within the new sys...

  • Viruses: nanoscopic takers (and possibly givers) of life

    TOKYO -- The Ebola outbreak in West Africa has claimed more than 1,500 lives and continues to accelerate, prompting the World Health Organization to call it an international public health emergency. In Japan, dengue fever has reappeared for the first...

  • Riken team has not reproduced STAP cells: interim experiment report

    TOKYO (Kyodo) -- The scandal-hit Riken research institute said Wednesday that its team has yet to reproduce through ongoing experiments the so-called STAP cells as claimed by scientist Haruko Obokata following allegations of misconduct regarding her ...

  • Riken to announce interim findings on STAP cell experiment

    TOKYO (Kyodo) -- The scandal-hit Riken research institute is set to announce later Wednesday its interim report on experiments to find out whether so-called STAP cells can be reproduced following allegations of misconduct by its researcher Haruko Obo...

  • Embattled Japanese lab fails to reproduce STAP cells

    OSAKA -- Scientists at Riken, the Japanese institute behind claims of an ingeniously novel method of creating stem cells, have been unable to duplicate the process despite multiple attempts, sources said Tuesday. The struggle to verify the result...

  • Japan to create international framework for Arctic research

    TOKYO -- Japan will set up an international framework for environmental research in the Arctic from next fiscal year to gain an edge in future resources development in the region. The project will mainly focus on developing new survey and predict...

  • Testing myths about sleep

    TOKYO -- There are common assumptions about sleep. Eight hours is optimal. Waking up on a multiple of 90 minutes is refreshing. Four hours of sleep is enough if it's done well. There are others, but are there any scientific grounds for these beliefs?...

  • Suicide further muddles already confusing STAP cell probe

    TOKYO -- The suicide earlier this month in Japan of one of the co-authors of controversial papers about STAP cell research has thrown into doubt the progress of inquiries being made. Yoshiki Sasai was the deputy director of the Center for Develop...

  • Brain chemical oxytocin is all for you, body and soul

    TOKYO -- Humans are certainly more than just sacks of chemicals, but there is no denying the important role played by hormones and other chemicals in human behavior. A case in point is oxytocin. The brain produces more of this hormone when affect...

  • WHO approves experimental treatments to combat Ebola

    GENEVA/WASHINGTON -- With the outbreak of Ebola in West Africa spinning out of control, the World Health Organization on Tuesday endorsed the use of untested drugs to curb the epidemic. The highly unusual step by the world health body reflects th...

  • STAP cells paper co-author Sasai commits suicide, notes found: police

    KOBE (Kyodo) -- A co-author of controversial research papers on so-called STAP cells committed suicide at an institute of the government-affiliated Riken and apparent suicide notes were found at the facility in Kobe, police said Tuesday. Yoshiki ...

  • Gil Van Bokkelen: Japan's leadership in regenerative medicine bearing fruit

    Much of the world is just beginning to feel the impact of an unprecedented event: the aging of the global population. In Japan, the percentage of those over the age of 80 will increase from 6% of the population in 2010 to more than 14% by 2030, accor...

  • Construction of world's largest telescope to begin in October

    TOKYO (Kyodo) -- Construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope, the world's largest, will begin in Hawaii in October as local authorities have approved a land lease for the project, Japan's National Astronomical Observatory said Tuesday. A ceremony...

  • The regeneration of stem cell research in South Korea

    TOKYO -- Nearly a decade after a star scientist's faked papers set back South Korean research on regenerative medicine, industry, government and academia are making a renewed push. Scientists in the country are progressing toward practical use of ver...

  • A matter of taste? Kyoto University to explore the science of Japanese food

    TOKYO -- Kyoto University will study the science behind the fascination with Japanese food from August. It will work with food maker Meiji and two well-established Japanese restaurants, Kyoto's Kikunoi and Kinobu, on the project. The study will s...

  • Nature to pull controversial stem cell papers

    TOKYO -- British scientific journal Nature is expected to retract as early as this week a pair of studies on a new way to produce stem cells in light of revelations that the lead author altered and fabricated images. Seen as groundbreaking at the...

  • Osaka University's new role: venture capitalist

    OSAKA -- Osaka University is planning a wholly owned venture capital firm to fund startups formed by its own faculty and students. If the plan receives government approval, the national university will become the first in Japan to establish a ven...

  • Does anyone still believe STAP cells exist?

    TOKYO -- What was hailed as a breakthrough method for making adult cells pluripotent, or able to develop into any kind of body tissue, has, four months after the exciting "discovery," turned out to be nothing more than a hypothesis. In late May, ...