Perspectives

Greg Foran: Private sector must back Abe's 'Womenomics'

There has been substantial discussion about the role of women in Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's strategy for driving economic recovery. Indeed, the prime minister even placed a commentary in the Wall Street Journal at the end of last year o...

  • Alicia Garcia-Herrero: EU must end China schizophrenia

    Europe's economic relationship with China is as vast as it is poorly understood. The European Union is China's main trading partner, with two-way trade valued at more than $1.35 billion per day. However the U.S. still clearly dominates China's foreig...

  • Gi-Wook Shin: How can Northeast Asia resolve its history wars?

    Northeast Asia is a global center of economic dynamism, propelled by phenomenal growth in social and cultural interactions among the region's nations. Still, wounds from past wrongs, committed during times of colonialism and war, have not yet fully h...

  • Kavi Chongkittavorn: Tenuous new ties in Asia's North Korean diplomacy

    The Dongwha Duty Free Shop in the Gwanghwamun shopping area of downtown Seoul is regularly thronged with visitors from China, some of the 4 million who now visit South Korea annually, making it the top tourist destination for Chinese travelers. At a ...

  • Vikram Nehru: Indonesia's maturing democracy faces its sternest test

    Indonesia's July 9 presidential election was a remarkable event. It was well organized, free of tension and violence, remarkably transparent, and implemented with immense civic pride. It was a celebration of democracy and an impressive display of pol...

  • All businesses need administrators -- but don't forget the dreamers

    Entrepreneurs create value. The polar opposite would be administrators, who manage assets and wealth built by others. Howard Stevenson, a professor of business administration at Harvard Business School, classifies businesspeople in these two broa...

  • Japan's sports intelligence can help national-level gathering capabilities

    TOKYO -- Japan is said to trail other major nations when it comes to intelligence-gathering capabilities, but this is not true for sporting events. Olympic superpowers are turning to Japan's meticulous techniques for the analyzing world-class athlete...

  • David I. Steinberg: Myanmar's improbable ascendance: Proceeding at its own pace

    At a recent discussion among Southeast Asian specialists in Washington, one astute observer remarked that Myanmar "is now the most liberal political regime on the Southeast Asian mainland." Even a few years ago, such a statement would have drawn ...

  • What Asia's love of rhino horn means for global security

    If you ever want to buy a secondhand AK-47 and ammunition, it will set you back about $500 on the black market in northern Thailand. Short of cash? Try selling some rhinoceros horn. Just a 500-gram chunk of rhino horn, easily carried in a trouser...

  • How will Indonesia's next president bend the arc of history?

    Indonesia is at a crucial moment in its history. Stretching behind it are 16 years of a post-Suharto era that saw the country quit authoritarianism, cold-turkey style, and plunge headlong into democracy and decentralization. The last decade has been ...

  • What is bad for Asia is bad for America

    TOKYO -- Now that the world has come to rely heavily on the Asian economy, countries in the region need to contribute to its stability if they wish to win investor confidence. One company acutely aware of this is General Motors. America's largest...

  • Kou Zonglai: Perverse incentives are behind China's commodity glut

    The fundamental cause of excess capacity in China is its industrial policy. In China, the government commits to development targets for each industrial sector and sets criteria that enterprises are required to meet if they want to enter the market. ...

  • Ken Kutaragi: China's social networks spin global webs

    China's Internet companies are making their presence felt globally. Weibo, a microblogging service some call China's answer to Twitter, listed on the U.S. Nasdaq market in April, reportedly raising $280 million. Alibaba Group, the biggest fish in...

  • China's inability to reflect on Tiananmen hints at risks

    Twenty-five years have passed since Chinese Communist Party rulers silenced the student-led pro-democracy movement by sending soldiers and tanks to Tiananmen Square. Calls for democracy and freedom have continued to this day. But over the years, Beij...

  • Japan, China need framework to avoid military mishaps

    History gives us numerous examples of an unintended clash between neighboring countries escalating into full-scale conflict. For Japan and China to avoid such a tragedy, the two countries urgently need to establish a crisis-management framework. ...

  • Kramer, Jelsma: Repressive policies only stoking Asean's drug problem

    The strategy of Asean's 10 member countries to become "drug free" by 2015 is failing dramatically. In the last decade, opium cultivation in the region has doubled, drug use -- especially of methamphetamines, a powerful synthetic stimulant -- has incr...

  • Simon Makinson: Myanmar should 'green' its banking desert

    Myanmar's banking landscape has been like a desert with no oasis -- but the climate seems set for a welcome change. Myanmar's domestic banks are small, undercapitalized, constrained by regulation and largely unused by the local population. Foreign ba...

  • Vikram Nehru: Myanmar should move cautiously in welcoming foreign banks

    Myanmar is considering opening its doors to foreign banks as part of its ambitious plans to overhaul the financial sector. That is terrific news. More worrying is that some of these banks are pressing for immediate majority foreign ownership in r...

  • Woody Epstein: 'Pandora's Promise': hope springs infernal

    I recently attended a presentation at the Japan Atomic Industry Forum given by Fuminori Tamba of Fukushima University. The professor showed the above photograph of a road near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, lined with about 130 signs in Russian. ...

  • Japan buys its way to Kyoto success

    Japan, it has been confirmed, fulfilled its obligations under the Kyoto Protocol, ostensibly meant to lower global-warming emissions. The country did so only by purchasing carbon credits rather than actually spewing less gas. The government ...