ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronEye IconIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailPositive ArrowIcon PrintTitle ChevronIcon Twitter
Business

A district that once defined Tokyo is getting a refit

Massive redevelopment projects are underway in Tokyo's Ginza district.

TOKYO -- Tokyo's Ginza district is getting a makeover.

Department store operator J. Front Retailing, developer Mori Building and trading house Sumitomo Corp. on Wednesday unveiled the outline of a new commercial facility under construction where the Matsuzakaya Ginza department store once stood. Ginza Six will open on April 20.

So why not keep the Matsuzakaya brand?

"What Ginza needs now is not to evolve the current department store," J. Front President Ryoichi Yamamoto replied, "but to make a whole new commercial complex that no one has ever seen."

Yamamoto was speaking Wednesday at a press conference at a Tokyo hotel.

Ginza Six will have 13 stories above ground and six basement levels. It will be the district's largest commercial facility, with floor space of 47,000 sq. meters. Of the 241 tenants, 122 will be their brand's Tokyo flagship.

Luxury is to be a main attraction. Christian Dior, a unit of France-based LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton, will have one of its largest outposts in the world there. It will use the first basement plus the first four floors.

Other Western brands -- including Fendi, Celine, Saint Laurent, Valentino and Van Cleef & Arpels -- will also open flagship outlets.

The complex will have a Tsutaya Books with cafe, and J. Front's Daimaru Matsuzakaya Department Stores will open a small variety store, Sixieme Ginza. The company expects the Ginza Six complex, including restaurants, to earn total sales of 60 billion yen ($574 million) in the complex's first fiscal year. It is targeting 20 million annual visitors.

Other changes are happening in Ginza. Department store Printemps Ginza will change its name to Marronnier Gate in January, after it terminates its trademark licensing contract with France's Printemps. The store has operated as Printemps Ginza for more than 30 years.

Electronics maker Sony opened Sony Building on a corner of Sukiyabashi Crossing in 1966. The shops closed in late August. In the summer of 2018 Ginza Sony Park opens in the same spot.

(Nikkei)

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 1 month for $0.99

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends January 31st

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to Nikkei Asia has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media

Nikkei Asian Review, now known as Nikkei Asia, will be the voice of the Asian Century.

Celebrate our next chapter
Free access for everyone - Sep. 30

Find out more