ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailPositive ArrowIcon PrintIcon Twitter
Agriculture

Taiwan passes bill to allow imports of US pork containing additive

American pork imports have long been hurdle to a possible FTA with US

Pigs are seen on a farm in Pingtung, Taiwan on Dec. 14.   © Reuters

TAIPEI -- Taiwan's parliament on Thursday passed a bill to allow imports of U.S. pork containing ractopamine residue from January, a move that paves the way to forging closer ties with Washington ahead of the inauguration of Joe Biden as president.

The ruling Democratic Progressive Party leveraged its majority in the Legislative Yuan to approve administrative orders that allows the import of pork containing the leanness-enhancing additive banned in the European Union and China.

Imports of American pork have long been a hurdle to a possible free trade agreement with the U.S. In 2012, the administration of then President Ma Ing-jeou failed in an attempt to lift the ban in the face of public and opposition pressure.

President Tsai Ing-wen announced on Aug. 28 that Taiwan would ease restrictions on imports of US pork containing ractopamine. The move came shortly after U.S. President Donald Trump's health secretary Alex Azar visited Taipei -- the highest level visit by a U.S. cabinet member since 1979. Tsai said at the time that Taiwan needs to make this decision to "capture the great opportunity of supply chain restructuring in the post-coronavirus era."

Taiwan's efforts to draw closer to the U.S. have been attacked by China, which views the island as part of its territory and objects to any formal engagement by Taiwan with other countries.

U.S. President-elect Joe Biden said in a recent interview that the U.S. would not sign a trade deal with any country before sorting out its own competitiveness, sparking concerns there will be no trade deal with Taiwan soon.

The Tsai administration's move has also sparked domestic criticism, as her Democratic Progressive Party has protested in the past against the opposition Kuomintang's plan to ban American pork imports.

KMT lawmakers have attacked the DPP over the issue, and in early December threw pork intestines and pig skins in the legislative chamber to express their anger.

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 1 month for $0.99

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends January 31st

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to Nikkei Asia has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media

Nikkei Asian Review, now known as Nikkei Asia, will be the voice of the Asian Century.

Celebrate our next chapter
Free access for everyone - Sep. 30

Find out more