ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailPositive ArrowIcon PrintIcon Twitter
Automobiles

Isuzu to source truck engines from Cummins for key models

US deal to help Japanese automaker focus on EV and other next-generation tech

Isuzu models mounted with Cummins engines will hit North America in 2021, before being released in Japan and other markets.

TOKYO -- Isuzu Motors will outsource diesel truck engines to Cummins, a U.S. engine supplier, in a move designed to allow the Japanese commercial vehicle maker to focus on emerging technologies, Nikkei learned on Wednesday.

The arrangement begins later this year and is expected to help save tens of millions of dollars in research and development expenses annually, sources said.

It comes as automakers around the world scramble to develop vehicles that meet increasingly stringent emissions standards.

The deal marks the first time for Isuzu to use third-party engines on its key truck models.

Engines are critical components, determining the performance of trucks. Automakers usually develop their own.

Engines from Cummins will be used in medium-size trucks requiring high horsepower. Models mounted with a Cummins engine will hit North America in 2021, before being released in Japan and other markets.

Cummins' engine plant in Columbus, Indiana. (Photo courtesy of Cummins)

The engines will be adjusted for each market so as to clear local regulations and requirements. Isuzu will take responsibility for the adjustments.

The partnership also envisages Isuzu supplying engines for small trucks to Cummins, which focuses on developing large engines for trucks and construction vehicles.

Since 2019 the companies have been collaborating on next-generation, low-emissions engines. The latest initiative represents an expansion of the partnership to cover existing diesel engines.

Isuzu sold some 290,000 trucks in the year ended March 2020.

Cummins engines initially will be used in a few percent of Isuzu vehicles. This could expand further if the arrangement proves cost-effective.

Electric truck development has been slow compared to passenger vehicles and is considered an urgent task.

Isuzu has other next-generation technology partners. It has teamed with Volvo to develop fuel cell vehicles and with Honda on autonomous driving technology.

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 1 month for $0.99

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends January 31st

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to Nikkei Asia has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media

Nikkei Asian Review, now known as Nikkei Asia, will be the voice of the Asian Century.

Celebrate our next chapter
Free access for everyone - Sep. 30

Find out more