ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailPositive ArrowIcon PrintIcon Twitter
Business

For Nintendo's Wii U, uniqueness was its downfall

OSAKA -- Nintendo's moribund Wii U struggled with a lack of support from software developers, who saw its unique features that set the game system apart as a hindrance.

Now slated to be discontinued in Japan, the Wii U launched in the autumn of 2012 and had sold roughly 13.36 million units worldwide as of Sept. 30. It is expected to go down as the worst-selling of the company's flagship consoles.

A touch screen in the controller was the signature hardware feature. Many third-party developers that aimed to also publish on such competing platforms as the PlayStation 4 doubted that they could recoup the costs of creating different versions for the Wii U. As a result, the Wii U's software library in Japan was just a quarter as large as that of the original Wii.

Nintendo also marketed its offerings as friendly to families and casual players, making the company an unlikely partner for developers targeting more serious gamers.

The Wii U's successor, the Switch, launches in March 2017. Whether this home-portable hybrid will be the "switch" needed to turn Nintendo's sales strategy around remains to be seen.

(Nikkei)

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 1 month for $0.99

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends January 31st

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to Nikkei Asia has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media

Nikkei Asian Review, now known as Nikkei Asia, will be the voice of the Asian Century.

Celebrate our next chapter
Free access for everyone - Sep. 30

Find out more