ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronEye IconIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailMenu BurgerPositive ArrowIcon PrintIcon SearchSite TitleTitle ChevronIcon Twitter
Companies

Japanese business hotel opens in Myanmar economic zone

First hotel in Thilawa anticipates greater demand as factories sprout up

The front desk of Super Hotel's new location in the Thilawa Special Economic Zone was made from a giant log. (Photo by Yuichi Nitta)

YANGON -- Japan's Super Hotel chain has opened the first lodgings in Myanmar's Thilawa Special Economic Zone outside Yangon, anticipating demand from business travelers as foreign companies build factories in the region.

Thilawa's development serves as the centerpiece of Japan and Myanmar's public-private partnership to improve the Southeast Asian country's economy. The industrial park opened in 2015 with 105 tenants committed to moving in. Super Hotel Myanmar Thilawa is the only full-fledged commercial facility at the site, however, amid lagging construction in the residential and commercial area adjacent to the industrial area.

The four-story hotel cost about 1.5 billion yen ($13.5 million). The recently opened property consists of 129 rooms, mostly with single beds. Some are furnished with small kitchens for long-term guests. The wood interior, including the front desk made from a giant log obtained locally, provides a calming atmosphere.

The Thilawa location is the Osaka-based business hotel chain's second facility in Myanmar. The first opened in Yangon in 2015.

"We want to open one hotel a year," Chairman Ryosuke Yamamoto told reporters here, anticipating greater demand from both industry and tourism.

The market is tricky, however.

"Prices were lower than initially expected after opening our first location, and we were forced to change our business plan," Yamamoto said. "We want to develop talent first and be patient about expanding our operations."

Future hotel developments primarily will be franchises run by local owners, rather than direct investments, the company said.

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Get Unlimited access

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends June 30th

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to the Nikkei Asian Review has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media