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Business

Japanese solar project aims to bridge India's energy gap

Hitachi, Itochu part of public-private partnership launching demonstration

TOKYO -- A group led by a Japanese green-energy body has started running a hybrid solar-energy system in India that could help meet the nation's growing electricity demand.

The solar microgrid, which also incorporates several diesel generators, will run on an experimental basis for two years, the Japanese-government-affiliated New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) said Monday. Japan's Hitachi, Hitachi Systems, Itochu and an Indian public development corporation are also involved in the project.

The microgrid will supply electricity to the Neemrana Industrial Park in the state of Rajasthan. The energy will be enough to power buildings occupying roughly 45,000 sq. meters while keeping diesel consumption down.

India is set to surpass the European Union to become the world's third-largest consumer of electricity by 2025. Its power demand is growing by 4.9% a year on average due to economic expansion. With Indian manufacturers often pointing to the country's unreliable power supply, NEDO aims to help fill the gap with more microgrid installations.

(Nikkei)

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