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Business

Microsoft to bring enterprise cloud services to Japan

Software giant to extend technology beyond peripheral uses

Microsoft Japan is bringing its enterprise cloud services to the police and businesses here within this year.

TOKYO -- Microsoft Japan will launch a large-scale cloud service in Japan this year that will enable major corporations to run their enterprise systems on the cloud. 

The software giant will introduce the cloud service it rolled out in May in the U.S., after boosting the capacity of its two data centers in Japan. The service will provide up to 60 terabytes in storage, allowing companies to run enterprise software from Germany's SAP, which is used by many big Japanese corporations. Microsoft Japan aims to sell its service to 400 companies over the next three years.

Not many Japanese businesses run their core systems on the cloud, although use of peripheral cloud systems is growing. Companies will be able to benefit from easier and faster analysis of big data and information collected by "internet of things" devices. Furthermore, the cloud will help firms trim operational, testing and system development costs, as well as outlays on data storage facilities. This will in turn help companies develop new services.

As more core business functions move to the cloud, Microsoft and Amazon.com are spending enormous amounts of money to ensure security through such means as saving data in multiple backup locations.

Microsoft Japan also created a high-speed data-processing service for policing institutions together with Tokyo-based software developer Focus Systems.  Currently, it takes three days on average for a computer to retrieve and clean up data on a confiscated device. But with the new service, such tasks can be completed in half a day.

Although Japan's public and private sectors remain wary of entrusting outside parties with vital information, Microsoft aims to overcome such reservations by bolstering security. Adoption by the police would mark the first use of the cloud for investigative and administrative tasks by Japanese law enforcement.

(Nikkei)

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