ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronCrossEye IconIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinShapeCreated with Sketch.Icon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailMenu BurgerPositive ArrowIcon PrintIcon SearchSite TitleTitle ChevronIcon Twitter
Companies

Panasonic eyes appliance rentals for new business model

Fixed-rate service aims to lock in customers and collect data

Panasonic will offer fixed-rate rentals of TVs, media players, kitchen appliances and more.   © Kyodo

OSAKA -- Panasonic will start a fixed-rate rental service in Japan for appliances like refrigerators as soon as 2020, hoping to shift to a new business model that brings in steady earnings.

The electronics maker will expand on a trial TV rental program launched in February, with plans to collect customer data from a wider variety of products.

Unlike existing appliance rental services that focus on corporate customers and people being transferred to new jobs away from their families, Panasonic will target a range of households with items including Blu-ray Disc records and kitchen appliances.

The shift toward the subscription method puts Panasonic among a wave of industry peers, as well as automakers like Toyota Motor and apparel companies, that are likewise leasing consumer durables at fixed rates. But profit models for such services are not yet fully proven, and a number of players have backed out.

Panasonic will use the program to gather data, such as on what TV channels users watch and when, to use in crafting sales promotions and developing new products and services

Details such as prices will be set based on knowledge gleaned from Panasonic's existing TV rental service. The company offers a range of seven TV models, with screens from 49 to 65 inches and display options such as ultra-high-resolution 4K or organic light-emitting diode technology, for monthly fees ranging from 3,400 yen to 14,000 yen ($30 to $124). Users can sign three- or five-year contracts, after which they can choose to pay a fee and keep using the set or switch it out for a new one.

A 55-inch OLED TV that retails for about 340,000 yen, for instance, can be rented for a monthly fee that starts at 9,800 yen and then falls to 7,800 yen from the second month.

Customers will be able to sign up for rental services at 2,500 of Panasonic's affiliated retail stores throughout Japan. The company hopes interacting with customers more in person will help to sell them other products.

Appliances have become increasingly commoditized as South Korean and Chinese makers rise to prominence, and Japanese manufacturers have tended to fall behind in the resulting price competition. Panasonic hopes the rental system will help it lock in customers as well as generate stable profit. It aims to raise its rate of repeat TV buyers to 80% from the current 41%.

Panasonic's peer Sony offers subscriptions to online services for its PlayStation 4 home game console and provides services related to its Aibo robotic dogs for a set fee. Canon is set to start offering a fixed rate, including printing fees, for the use of multi-function office devices.

Even the auto sector has joined in, with Toyota launching a service that lets users drive its premium Lexus lineup and other luxury cars for a fixed monthly fee. So has the fashion industry, with clothing company Renown launching a monthly-fee business suit rental service on six-month intervals and department store operator Isetan Mitsukoshi Holdings introducing dress rentals.

But unlike digital subscription services for music and movies, for instance, physical goods like cars, appliances and apparel require inventory management and maintenance. Offering conveniences like easy exchanges often increases costs and slows down operations.

Menswear company Aoki, part of Aoki Holdings, in November abandoned a monthly-fee business attire rental service it launched just seven months earlier after costs grew beyond expectations.

Continuous innovation is needed to lock in customers, said Yasunobu Kyogoku of U.S. investment firm Innovation Global Capital, who is versed in fixed-rate services. Major companies and startups alike need the same sense of speed, Kyogoku added.

Get unique insights on Asia, the most dynamic market in the world.

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Get Unlimited access

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends January 31st

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to the Nikkei Asian Review has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media