ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronCrossEye IconIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailMenu BurgerPositive ArrowIcon PrintIcon SearchSite TitleTitle ChevronIcon Twitter
Companies

Singapore's MyRepublic joins crowded mobile market with StarHub

Broadband company strikes deal to become virtual network operator

Singapore's mobile market is saturated, with a penetration rate of over 100%.   © Reuters

SINGAPORE -- Broadband internet provider MyRepublic is pushing into mobile services in Singapore through a partnership with StarHub, further stoking the competitive fires in the city-state's telecom market.

MyRepublic will be able to use StarHub's network infrastructure to offer services, under a mobile virtual network operator arrangement announced on Thursday. Yap Yong Teck, managing director of MyRepublic Singapore, said the company is targeting "Singapore's younger, more tech-savvy crowd."

"That is where we will continue with a focus [on] our mobility services," he added. The company is aiming for a service launch within 2018.

MyRepublic has been trying to get into the mobile game since 2015. It sought to become Singapore's fourth telecom operator but lost out to Australia's TPG Telecom, which is to start its service toward the end of the year. MyRepublic opted for the MVNO partnership instead.

MVNO deals allow companies to provide mobile services by buying mobile bandwidth from one of the incumbent players, with no need to develop their own networks. Other MNVO partnerships include one between Circles.Life and Singapore's third-largest telecom operator, M1, which signed an agreement in May 2016.

The incumbents, including Singapore Telecommunications, face a difficult competitive environment in a country where smartphone and mobile broadband penetration exceeds 100%.

"The telecom sector will remain under pressure," Eugene Chia, an OCBC analyst, wrote in a recent report. Citing the saturated market, he said average revenue per mobile and broadband user is likely to decline, "translating to weaker service revenue" for telecom companies.

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Get Unlimited access

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends January 31st

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to the Nikkei Asian Review has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media