ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailPositive ArrowIcon PrintIcon Twitter
Business

South Korean AI startup targets kids' toys

AIBrain will launch toy robot Tyche in March

 (placeholder image)
A panel discussion at the annual Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas in January 2014.   © Reuters

SEOUL -- As artificial intelligence becomes more and more prevalent in commerce and industry, one South Korean venture company is betting on the future of children's toys and games equipped with the technology.

AIBrain was founded in 2012 by CEO Richard Shinn, who saw huge potential in the future of AI. The company's target market is similar to that of SoftBank Group for its humanoid robot Pepper.

AIBrain CEO Richard Shinn (Photo courtesy of AIBrain)

In March, the company is set to launch Tyche, an AI-equipped toy robot. Preorders are already being taken on its website and hundreds of sales are expected initially.

Tyche is a miniature car-shaped robot to which users connect a smartphone. Once the two are combined, a character appears on the screen which chats with the owner.

The devices, priced at $199, is designed as an educational toy, with applications such as language study and the technology it uses has earned global praise; it won innovation award at the Consumer Electronics Show in the U.S. in 2014.

According to Shinn, Tyche can exchange greetings and answer simple questions such as about the weather in the local area. The toy is currently available in English and Korean but the company plans to increase the number of language options.

AIBrain is also developing a smartphone-based AI game set in everyday life scheduled for release by the end of this year.

Before setting up AIBrain, Shinn had an information security company listed on the South Korea's Kosdaq market for startups. He said his company can now focus on development without having to worry about raising working capital for the next few years.

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 1 month for $0.99

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends January 31st

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to Nikkei Asia has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media

Nikkei Asian Review, now known as Nikkei Asia, will be the voice of the Asian Century.

Celebrate our next chapter
Free access for everyone - Sep. 30

Find out more