ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronEye IconIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailPositive ArrowIcon PrintSite TitleTitle ChevronIcon Twitter
Companies

Venture pairs Nissan's Leaf with solar energy to cut utility costs

Automaker joins with Japan telecom provider NTT to offer service to companies

The Leaf is Nissan's flagship electric vehicle. Its batteries will be utilized as a building power source in the new service. 

TOKYO -- Nissan Motor and Japanese telecom provider NTT Group will kick off a service as early as this year that allows corporations to cut utility bills by tapping power generated by electric vehicles and solar panels during peak demand. 

The service can also be used as an emergency power source in the event of a disaster.

Osaka-based NTT Smile Energy, which handles the telecom provider's power business, will work with Nissan to expand the service across the country. Nissan will lease its flagship electric vehicle, the Leaf, to companies and NTT will install solar panels on such places as rooftops.

In addition to using solar energy during the daytime business hours when power consumption is high, cheaper overnight power is stored in the batteries of the electric vehicles to be tapped during the daytime. 

Details are yet to be hammered out, but NTT, as Nippon Telegraph and Telephone is known, will become the service provider and take a cut of the cost savings as compensation. 

Nissan will sell such data as the operating status of the Leaf and its power levels to NTT for a fee. NTT will then analyze the most efficient way of using power and managing the balance between the solar energy systems and electric vehicle batteries over the cloud. The parties expect demand from companies not only seeking to cut costs but also looking to increase use of renewable energy and to have electric vehicles as a backup power sources during a disaster.

Nissan and NTT West demonstrated the technology last summer at a company site in Yamaguchi. Electricity costs were cut by a tenth by using 16.5 kilowatts from solar power and the batteries of three Leaf vehicles during peak hours. The branch, which employs about 300 people, was able to reduce electricity costs by about 1 million yen ($9,110), or 10% of its total bill.

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Get Unlimited access

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends April 30th

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to the Nikkei Asian Review has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media