ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronEye IconIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailMenu BurgerPositive ArrowIcon PrintIcon SearchSite TitleTitle ChevronIcon Twitter
Biotechnology

Hitachi, University of Tokyo team on 'Super Smart Society'

University of Tokyo President Makoto Gonokami, left, and Hitachi Chairman Hiroaki Nakanishi celebrate the debut of their Society 5.0 collaboration.

TOKYO -- Hitachi and the University of Tokyo officially debuted a collaboration Monday on ways to create a vision for the "Super Smart Society" of the future, enriched by technologies like big-data analysis and artificial intelligence.

The Super Smart Society also is dubbed Society 5.0, representing the next phase after hunting, agriculture, industry and the information age.

The Tokyo-based conglomerate will assign 12 research and development personnel to the new Hitachi The University of Tokyo Laboratory on campus, interacting with academic researchers in a broad range of fields to formulate and answer questions about the Super Smart Society and envision the Japanese economy of the future.

Hitachi is forging similar unconventional relationships with Kyoto University and Hokkaido University. The company aims to transform from a producer and seller of things into a business that identifies corporate and social issues using AI and works with private companies and government groups to resolve those issues.

The 19,000 collaborations in Japan between industry and academia in fiscal 2014 represent a 70% rise from a decade ago. But the money typically invested in each one during that time remained stuck around 2 million yen ($19,500), according to the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology.

Yoichi Ito, director-general of the ministry's Science and Technology Policy Bureau, said the initiative between Hitachi and the University of Tokyo "redefines the meaning of collaboration between industry and academia." He urged Japanese companies to increase investment for research with universities.

(Nikkei)

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Get Unlimited access

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends October 31st

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to the Nikkei Asian Review has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media