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Nintendo won't copy games directly to smartphones

TOKYO -- Nintendo President Satoru Iwata and DeNA counterpart Isao Moriyasu spoke about their newly announced alliance at a news conference held here Tuesday.

     Excerpts from the discussion follow.

Q: Why did you decide to work together?

Iwata: Nintendo aims to grow the gaming population by increasing the number of people exposed to our intellectual property, such as characters and games. Working with a company with online expertise lets us more quickly spread Nintendo IP via smartphones.

     It would be a misunderstanding to say that this partnership is the result of a process of elimination. We had a variety of offers and specifically chose DeNA.

Moriyasu: Smartphone gaming applications are DeNA's main business. When we thought about future growth, we believed taking advantage of Nintendo's IP would be an effective route. We won't just jointly develop [games], but we'll also release titles of our own. We'll learn from Nintendo and create amazing games.

Q: You have argued that smartphones tend to erode the value of games.

Iwata: We won't release the same game for smartphones and consoles. There are many examples of a game being released with only the system being changed, but consumers feel less satisfied since they can't get the same experience as with the original system. We want to use smartphones to globally spread IP cultivated on dedicated hardware.

Q: What will each company's role be in joint game development?

Moriyasu: We'll make use of both companies' strong points. Nintendo will often handle the game development itself while DeNA takes care of such areas as server development. DeNA can make a significant contribution in its specialty areas.

(Nikkei)

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