ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronEye IconIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailMenu BurgerPositive ArrowIcon PrintIcon SearchSite TitleTitle ChevronIcon Twitter
Business

Fully farmed octopus on its way to your dinner table

'Full-cycle' production ramping up as global demand soars

Octopus in an aquaculture tank at Nippon Suisan Kaisha. The Japanese seafood company in April succeeded in incubating fully farmed octopus.

TOKYO -- Japanese fisheries companies are developing full-cycle aquaculture technology, in hopes of offering a stable supply of fish to meet growing global demand for fisheries products.

Nippon Suisan Kaisha, also known as Nissui, announced on June 8 that it had in April succeeded in hatching eggs of fully farmed octopus at its Oita Marine Biological Technology Center in Saeki, Oita Prefecture, in western Japan.

The seafood company confirmed the hatching of about 140,000 eggs produced by octopus conceived by artificial incubation. Nissui will check the growing conditions, hoping to ship fully farmed octopus to retailers and restaurants across Japan as early as 2020.

Full-cycle aquaculture refers to artificial incubation of eggs produced by marine animals that were themselves conceived by artificial incubation. There has been no full-cycle aquaculture technology for octopus, as they have a low survival rate of about 30 days after being hatched. Nissui has identified aquatic organisms that are food suitable for growing octopus, and is using them to build the full-cycle aquaculture technology.

Maruha Nichiro will next spring spend about 500 million yen ($4.55 million) to build a new hatchery for eggs of greater amberjack in Minamisatsuma, in the southern prefecture of Kagoshima. The seafood company currently grows and ships young fish imported from China. The new hatchery will enable the company to incubate eggs in Japan. Young greater amberjack will be shipped to its own farms and to other farmers. The company expects to ship 300,000 greater amberjack a year.

Maruha Nichiro hopes a new hatchery will make a full-cycle aquaculture commercially available. The company now imports young fish to farm yellowtail, but plans to switch to aquaculture in Japan in the future.

(Nikkei)

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Get Unlimited access

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends June 30th

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to the Nikkei Asian Review has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media