ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailPositive ArrowIcon PrintIcon Twitter
Health Care

Fujifilm chooses India for first medical screening service

Japanese company aims to open 100 centers in Southeast Asia and other regions

Fujifilm's first medical screening center in India will target medium- to high-income earners. (Photo courtesy Fujifilm)

TOKYO -- Fujifilm will launch a medical screening service in emerging markets, with its first facility slated for a February launch in India, the company said on Monday.

The service will check for signs of cancer and lifestyle diseases using the company's medical equipment and artificial intelligence-based diagnosis technology.

Fujifilm aims to open 100 similar facilities in Southeast Asia, the Middle East, Africa and other regions. The Japanese company will partner with Indian hospital operator Dr. Kutty's Healthcare in forming a new company to operate the facility.

The center will open on Feb. 4 in Bangalore and screen for cancer -- including breast and oral cancers -- as well as for early signs of pulmonary disease and heart attacks.

Fujifilm said the service will perform many of the same screenings as those done in comprehensive physical examinations.

The service will analyze images from CT scans or use mammography and technologies to help with diagnosis. Prices will not exceed about 20,000 yen ($193) thanks to the use of AI.

Fujifilm will target medium- to high-income earners in Bangalore, a large IT hub. It also hopes the facility's services will be covered by employee benefit programs and insurance plans, with the goal of screening 10,000 patients annually.

Fujifilm plans to expand the business to major Indian cities, as well as the United Arab Emirates, Indonesia, Vietnam and other countries. It also plans to roll out mobile clinics to offer screenings at factories and in suburbs.

Few facilities for physical exams are available in emerging countries, where regular health checkups are not the norm. Only about 30% of cancer patients survive for five years in India -- much lower than in advanced nations.

Fujifilm manufactures and sells X-ray imaging devices and endoscopes. It has in the past operated checkup programs for governments of emerging countries, but this is the first time it will run a screening facility. The company has "no plan to operate one in Japan at this point," a company spokesperson said.

In order to help detect cancers and lifestyle diseases early in emerging countries, the company will encourage regular health checkups. Performance of the Banglaore screening center and staff input will help Fujifilm develop new medical equipment.

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 1 month for $0.99

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends July 31st

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to Nikkei Asia has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media

Nikkei Asian Review, now known as Nikkei Asia, will be the voice of the Asian Century.

Celebrate our next chapter
Free access for everyone - Sep. 30

Find out more