ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronEye IconIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailMenu BurgerPositive ArrowIcon PrintIcon SearchSite TitleTitle ChevronIcon Twitter
Property

Japan's land prices rise for 2nd year on tourism, ultra-low rates

Regional commercial land prices up for first time in 28 years

Land prices are rising at a faster pace, helped by strong demand in Tokyo, as well as a recovery in smaller regional cities. (Photo by Maho Obata)

TOKYO (Reuters) -- Japanese land prices rose for the second straight year in the year to July with the increase spreading beyond big cities, a government survey showed, a sign the benefits from the central bank's ultra-low interest rate policy are broadening.

The 0.4 percent increase in average land prices was faster than the previous year's 0.1 percent gain and driven partly by rising property prices in regional Japan, the survey showed on Thursday, underscoring the strength of the economy's recovery.

The survey by the land ministry captures the prices of land on July 1 and compares the rate of growth against the same period a year earlier.

Land prices are among data closely watched by the Bank of Japan to gauge how its ultra-loose monetary policy is affecting the economy and asset prices.

Commercial land prices in regional Japan, which excludes metropolitan areas surrounding Tokyo, Osaka and Nagoya, were up 0.3% in the year to July 1, turning positive for the first time since Japan's asset-inflated bubble collapsed 28 years ago.

A steady increase in inbound tourists and ultra-low interest rates propped up demand for hotel construction and office buildings, the government said in the survey.

Nationwide commercial land prices rose 1.7% after a 1.1% gain the previous year, helped by strong office building demand in major cities, the survey showed.

Residential land prices slid 0.1%, a slower pace than the previous year's 0.3% decline, the survey showed.

The ministry surveyed about 21,500 locations nationwide. The survey is used as a standard for land transactions, together with another one published by the ministry in March.

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Get Unlimited access

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends October 31st

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to the Nikkei Asian Review has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media