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Nissan's Ghosn crisis

Ghosn's latest bail request rejected by Tokyo court

TOKYO (Kyodo) -- A Tokyo court rejected Tuesday another bail request from the lawyers of former Nissan Motor Co. Chairman Carlos Ghosn, who has been detained since November over allegations of financial misconduct.

Ghosn's lawyers had filed a bail request for a second time after Tokyo prosecutors indicted the 64-year-old on Jan. 11 on new charges, including aggravated breach of trust in relation to the alleged transfer of private investment losses to Nissan in 2008.

Ghosn was first arrested on Nov. 19 for allegedly understating his remuneration, and his detention has been extended multiple times following additional allegations, all of which he denies.

Under the Japanese judicial system, a bail request can be made multiple times. A Japanese court in principle grants bail when there is no risk of a suspect fleeing or destroying evidence.

In a statement distributed by a spokeswoman for his family, Ghosn stated Sunday that he would accept "any and all" bail conditions set by a Japanese court.

The former chairman is facing three charges -- two related to the understatement of billions of yen of remuneration in securities reports presented to Japanese regulators over the eight years through March 2018, and one regarding aggravated breach of trust.

Ghosn's Tokyo-based chief lawyer, Motonari Otsuru, had said the former chairman may not be granted bail before the start of his trial, seen unlikely to begin before June partly due to the complexity of the case that involves documents in both Japanese and English.

As a case of aggravated breach of trust would involve a massive amount of evidence, pretrial preparations could take months or even more than a year, according to a senior prosecutor.

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