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Nissan's Ghosn crisis

Ghosn's wife returns to Tokyo for questioning in misconduct probe

Spotlight on funds passed to company where Carole Ghosn was president

Carlos Ghosn is pictured with his wife Carole at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival.   © Reuters

TOKYO -- Carole Ghosn, the wife of former Nissan Motor boss Carlos Ghosn, has returned to Japan to be questioned as a witness in the investigation into allegations of financial misconduct by her husband.

Carole Ghosn, who went to France after the rearrest of her husband last week, will be interrogated by prosecutors and judges in a Tokyo court on Thursday, Nikkei has learned.

She had been living in Tokyo with Ghosn since March 6, when he was released on bail after 108 days in jail. Carlos Ghosn is accused of misusing company funds -- an allegation he denies. He was arrested again on April 4, this time on new charges of aggravated breach of trust, which he also denies.

Prosecutors have suggested that Carole Ghosn was a beneficiary of the alleged misconduct. They have alleged that some of the money transferred from Nissan to an Omani distributor was channeled to Beauty Yacht, a company where she is registered as president.

Sources revealed that she decided to return to Japan in order to explain that there was no wrongdoing.

Prosecutors and judges are expected to focus on her role in the case, as well as how she became president of Beauty Yacht.

People close to Carole Ghosn said she went to France to lobby the United Nations and the French government to fight for her husband's civil rights. They also said she denied suggestions that she had ran away from an interrogation to avoid questioning.

Japan's code of criminal procedure allows prosecutors to ask judges to question a witness who refuses voluntary questioning, before they open the first trial on the allegations.

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