ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailPositive ArrowIcon PrintIcon Twitter
Nissan's Ghosn crisis

Paris determined to keep tight rein on Renault-Nissan

Japan automaker fears ceding power under France's holding company plan

The French government has tried to irreversibly combine Renault and Nissan Motor to protect the interests of an important player in the country's economy.
The French government has tried to irreversibly combine Renault and Nissan Motor to protect the interests of an important player in the country's economy.   © Reuters

TOKYO -- The arrest of alliance head and linchpin Carlos Ghosn has not deterred the French government from its push to permanently combine Renault and Nissan Motor in a way that would strengthen its influence over both.

French newspaper Le Figaro reported Monday that Renault will hold a board meeting as early as Wednesday to determine its new leadership. The French government -- which owns about 15% of Renault -- is said to be leading the search for Ghosn's successor as CEO, raising the possibility that the new chief will officially seek a merger with Nissan. Paris recently sent a delegation to inform Tokyo of its intention to bring the two automakers together under the umbrella of a holding company.

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

Nikkei Asian Review, now known as Nikkei Asia, will be the voice of the Asian Century.

Celebrate our next chapter
Free access for everyone - Sep. 30

Find out more