ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailPositive ArrowIcon PrintIcon Twitter
SoftBank

SoftBank shares hit fresh high on Vision Fund turnaround

Tech investor on track for seven-day winning streak

SoftBank Group’s share price has risen 24% since the start of the year, beating the benchmark Nikkei 225 index's 7% gain.   © Reuters

TOKYO -- SoftBank Group's share price rose more than 5% on Tuesday and edged closer to a record high, after the technology investor reported strong earnings from its Vision Fund on Monday.

SoftBank opened 5% higher, at 9,956 yen, before surpassing the 10,000 yen mark for the first time since February 2000, after accounting for stock splits, and reached 10,140 yen at it highest point. It closed at 9,808 yen, up 3.4%. 

The rally kept shares on track for seven straight trading days of gains and brought the rise since the start of the year to 24%, beating the benchmark Nikkei 225 index's 7% gain.

The Japanese company's shares set their record during the height of the 2000 dot-com bubble.

On Monday, SoftBank reported net profit of 1.17 trillion yen ($11 billion) for the quarter ended in December, thanks to investment gains from its Vision Fund investments. Masayoshi Son, the group's chairman and CEO, reaffirmed his confidence in the fund while playing down the significance of its loss-making asset management arm that invests in listed stocks.

In response, some analysts said SoftBank was well positioned to take advantage of the strong appetite for tech stocks.

"In an IPO-frenzied market, where investors are keen to secure pre-IPO allocations, [SoftBank] boasts stakes in [about] 150 investments in private companies ... with dozens getting ready for listing," Jefferies analyst Atul Goyal wrote in a report. He raised the price target on SoftBank's shares from 7,450 yen to 10,770 yen.

Satoru Kikuchi, an analyst at SMBC Nikko Securities, wrote in a research note that "multiple IPOs are expected at Vision Fund's investment destinations, and large profits will continue to be recorded."

Citigroup analyst Mitsunobu Tsuruo noted that among the potential risks are the fact that SoftBank "relies on the talents of a relatively small number of individuals," as well as the restructuring of U.S. office space provider WeWork.

Additional reporting by Jada Nagumo in Tokyo

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 1 month for $0.99

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends January 31st

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to Nikkei Asia has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media

Nikkei Asian Review, now known as Nikkei Asia, will be the voice of the Asian Century.

Celebrate our next chapter
Free access for everyone - Sep. 30

Find out more