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Soon, technology will make you feel like 'Superman': Phil Libin, CEO of Evernote

Phil Libin

Advances in workplace technology are going to make everyone a superhero, or at least feel like one.

     No, you will not be bestowed with any mighty physical abilities.

     But software is likely to make you much more "aware" of your surroundings and the world at large, according to Phil Libin, CEO of Evernote.

     The company's eponymous note-taking application allows users to archive vast amounts of information.

     Gone are the days when companies and individuals grappled with insufficient information, Libin told a forum session on new generation technology for the next decade. "Internet search technology has made unlimited facts available to all of us. It is very rare that you don't have enough data. If anything, we have too much."

     With so much data to sift through, it is becoming increasingly difficult to discern exactly what piece of information is needed to make a sound decision swiftly. This is where Evernote comes in, Libin said.

     The company, which counts Nikkei as one of its investors, is creating a workplace ecosystem through its namesake app. Users can not only record information but also seamlessly collaborate on projects with colleagues.

     Libin explained that another Evernote creation, called Context, is designed to help users write more effectively by compiling, combing through and presenting relevant information in real time.

     Tomorrow's technology, Libin said, should "augment" human intelligence by providing users with the insights and information they need -- before they even look for it.

Like a superhero

"I really don't believe that most people want to talk to their gadgets," Libin said.

     "I don't actually think that people want to talk to their watches. I want to talk to people, I don't want to talk to technology. ... I think this idea that you have to ask technology to do something is a very short-term phase that we are going through," he continued.

     "We're going to move away from having technology that feels like it's your assistant, and move toward making you feel aware, augmenting your intelligence, making you feel you have superpowers."

     That, he suggested, will be more satisfying.

     "I want to be Superman," Libin said. "I want to do all the work myself."

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