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Technology

Do cloth masks work? Supercomputer Fugaku says yes

World's fastest computer calculates that nonwoven fabric is best

Japan's Fugaku modeled the performance of cotton, polyester and nonwoven fabric masks in blocking spray from cough by the wearer. (Photo courtesy of the Riken Center for Computational Science)

TOKYO -- Masks made of nonwoven fabric performed best in a Japanese supercomputer model of their ability to block virus-carrying respiratory droplets, but other types of masks also showed effectiveness.

Japan's Fugaku, which recently took the title of world's fastest supercomputer, modeled the performance of cotton, polyester and nonwoven fabric masks in blocking spray from cough by the wearer. The government-backed Riken institute announced the results Monday.

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