ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronEye IconIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailMenu BurgerPositive ArrowIcon PrintIcon SearchSite TitleTitle ChevronIcon Twitter
Economy

China's economic slowdown stands out in fresh data

Industrial output sinks to 10-year low as multinationals flee tariffs

A continued slump in China's auto industry weighed on industrial data last month.   © Reuters

BEIJING -- New Chinese economic indicators show increasing downward pressure on growth, with the trade war taking a toll on industrial production even as consumer spending slows.

Beijing appears inclined to let its current round of stimulus measures run its course, with a fiscal policy official saying: "The impact of tax cuts will become evident in the second half of the year."

But the government appears unlikely to tolerate a further slowdown in the run-up to the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic in October, and additional stimulus could be deployed. The Communist Party stressed at a Politburo meeting last month that the handling of the economy in the second half of the year is of "great significance."

The National Bureau of Statistics used unusually bearish language in its assessment of Wednesday's data, pointing to "the complicated and grave external environment and the mounting downward pressure on the economy."

This reflects the dim outlook illustrated by the numbers themselves, with key indicators weakening almost across the board and missing market expectations.

Industrial production rose just 4.8% on the year in July, the weakest pace in more than 10 years. Output growth decelerated 1.5 percentage points from June, dropping beneath the near-term low of 5% touched in May.

Weakness in areas that had stayed solid until recently, including petrochemicals and crude steel, compounded a continued slump in the auto industry. Electricity generation, which reflects overall manufacturing activity, edged up just 0.6%.

While production expanded at state-owned enterprises and mainland private-sector companies, overseas or offshore businesses saw a 0.2% contraction -- an unusual occurrence that followed a 0.3% drop in May. The decline may be linked to the trend of companies moving Chinese operations elsewhere as Sino-American trade tensions drag on.

Consumer spending also slowed. Retail sales grew 7.6% in July, down from 9.8% in June. The drop-off owed partly to the impact of new emissions standards on car sales. But the data also showed lackluster results in other sectors, with apparel and appliance sales each rising only about 3%.

The slowdown in the clothing business is evidenced by a shuttered La Chapelle store at a shopping center in a Beijing office district. Shanghai La Chapelle Fashion, once feted as China's answer to European fast-fashion brand Zara, closed roughly 2,400 stores on a net basis in the first half of 2019 alone amid flagging sales.

The cooling economy is hitting even the previously resilient service sector. Value added by the sector rose 6.3% last month, down 0.8 point from June and the weakest since the government began tracking the indicator in 2017. Based on the added-value figures for the industrial and service sectors, July's gross domestic product growth may come in under 6%.

Manufacturing investment proved a bright spot, thanks to government efforts to encourage it through tax cuts. While the 3.3% year-on-year expansion for the seven months through July may look unimpressive on its own, it represents a 0.3-point improvement from the January-June figure.

A statistics bureau survey found that 55% of manufacturers had benefited from the 2 trillion yuan ($283 billion) in tax and fee reductions decided by the government in March.

If the pressure on the economy continues, Beijing could turn to monetary easing or other measures to shore it up.

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Get Unlimited access

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends June 30th

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to the Nikkei Asian Review has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media