ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailPositive ArrowIcon PrintIcon Twitter
Economy

Financial reality forcing Mongolia to accept outsiders like Rio Tinto

ULAN BATOR -- Just over a kilometer south of Genghis Khan's statue in front of Mongolia's government house sits the headquarters of Oyu Tolgoi, the local joint venture of global miner Rio Tinto. 

The gaze of the 13th-century leader of the Mongol horde, said to be on watch against invaders from the south, meets the logo of Oyu Tolgoi, which is developing the biggest foreign investment project in the country's history. But while the old warrior stands guard, the current government's wariness about foreign investors taking away the country's minerals is easing.

After years of clashes over the $6.5 billion Oyu Tolgoi mine, the first copper shipments are at last reaching customers.

That is not to say the government, which owns one-third of Oyu Tolgoi, and Rio Tinto, the Anglo-Australian company that indirectly controls the rest, have resolved all their conflicts. The government continues to seek a higher share of the Gobi Desert mine's proceeds than that stipulated in the 2009 investment agreement. With approval of a planned $4 billion financing package to build an underground shaft facing an uncertain fate in parliament, Turquoise Hill Resources, the company through which Rio has invested, said Nov. 14 that it may instead raise $2.4 billion through a share offer. The company halted digging of the shaft in July, resulting in the layoff of 1,700 workers, shortly after the open-cut section of the mine went into production.

Parliament, though, has softened its tone in light of the country's faltering finances. Lawmakers returned from recess two weeks early in September for an emergency session after the tugrik, the local currency, fell 7% against the U.S. dollar in a month. New figures also showed that Mongolia suffered a 43% on-year decline in foreign investment in the first half of 2013, and that this year's budget deficit would likely exceed the legal limit of 2% of gross domestic product.

The chastened parliament endorsed a new foreign investment law. This removed a restriction, imposed in 2012, requiring government approval for foreign private companies' investments in "strategic sectors," including mining. 

To narrow the deficit, parliament is now considering budget amendments that would cut spending for the year by 10.8%, to 6.6 trillion tugrik ($3.78 billion). Expected revenue has fallen 13.7% to 6.3 trillion tugrik.

The shortfall in returns traces back to Oyu Tolgoi, which the International Monetary Fund has projected will generate a third of Mongolia's GDP when it reaches full production. Ulan Bator received $280 million from the mine last year, according to Rio, which made it the country's second-largest source of tax revenue before commercial operations had even begun. 

For Mongolia, the good news is that royalties are finally coming in. Shipments to companies in China, the primary customers for the mine, were held up until Oct. 19. The copper languished at a bonded warehouse just over the frontier, blocked from entry by Chinese customs officials ostensibly over missing paperwork. 

Meanwhile, the opening of the mine has expanded Rio's copper output by almost a quarter, according to Surenjav Odbayar, head of research for Ulan Bator broker National Securities. Yet copper prices are expected to fall in the coming months as supply growth, mostly from other mines, outpaces demand. 

The appetite of China, the metal's biggest consumer, is a key variable. Analysts surveyed by Reuters expect supply to exceed demand this year by 182,000 tons, with the surplus rising to 328,000 tons next year.

A positive resolution of the Oyu Tolgoi saga is critical for reassuring foreign investors, such as U.S.-based Peabody Energy and French uranium miner Areva, that Mongolia will not continually seek to revise terms of investment. 

But the business environment remains unpredictable. 

The Mineral Resources Authority earlier this month canceled exploration licenses held by Canada's Kincora Copper and 77 other companies after the officials who issued them were found guilty of corruption. The government and the licensees are discussing how to proceed.

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 1 month for $0.99

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends July 31st

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to Nikkei Asia has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media

Nikkei Asian Review, now known as Nikkei Asia, will be the voice of the Asian Century.

Celebrate our next chapter
Free access for everyone - Sep. 30

Find out more