ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronEye IconIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailMenu BurgerPositive ArrowIcon PrintIcon SearchSite TitleTitle ChevronIcon Twitter
Economy

Japan-US trade talks to continue for one more day, Motegi says

Talks to iron out differences in key beef and auto sectors in 'final shape'

Japan's Economic Revitalization Minister Toshimitsu Motegi speaks to reporters on Aug. 22.

WASHINGTON (Kyodo) -- Japan and the United States will continue their ministerial-level trade negotiations for one more day, Japanese economic revitalization minister Toshimitsu Motegi said Thursday.

Motegi and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer started the latest round of trade talks in Washington on Wednesday, with the focus on whether the two countries can iron out differences in views over tariff cuts on key sectors such as beef and automobiles.

"Our discussions are beginning to take final shape" in areas involving agricultural and industrial products as well as in digital trade such as e-commerce, Motegi told reporters following the second day of the talks.

But he also said negotiations "take time" and that he will meet Lighthizer also on Friday. The talks had been scheduled to take place for at least two days.

The current negotiations are expected to lay the groundwork for a meeting between Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and U.S. President Donald Trump on the fringes of the Group of Seven summit in Paris from Saturday to Monday.

With Trump seeking a bilateral deal to fix what he sees as an imbalanced trade relationship and reduce the hefty U.S. trade deficit with Japan, Tokyo and Washington have been engaging in negotiations with an eye to reaching a deal by September.

Motegi told reporters Wednesday that Japan and the United States are getting closer to the "final stage" of their talks, but have also admitted that there are gaps the two countries have yet to bridge.

The United States has demanded greater market access for American beef, pork, wheat and dairy products, while Japan aims to eliminate U.S. tariffs on vehicles and auto parts.

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Get Unlimited access

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends June 30th

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to the Nikkei Asian Review has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media