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Sections of Nagano were filled with muddy water. (Photo by Akira Kodaka)
Natural disasters

In pictures: Typhoon Hagibis tears Japan apart

Strongest storm in decades kills at least 68; rescue operations continue

TOKYO -- Typhoon Hagibis, one of the strongest typhoons Japan has experienced in decades, tore through eastern and northern Japan on Saturday and early Sunday, killing at least 68 people and leaving more than a dozen others missing.

Search and rescue operations are continuing, as more than 140 rivers flooded and left houses and buildings inundated with water.

Below are photographs from scenes around the country.

Oct. 10

  © Getty Images

A television screen shows the potential impact of Typhoon Hagibis.

The video shows a residential area and train marshaling yard near the Chikuma River in the city of Nagano, before and after Typhoon Hagibis struck.

Oct. 11

(Photo by Ken Kobayashi)

A supermarket runs out of essential staple items, such as bread, as people stockpile food in Tokyo.

Oct. 12

(Photo by Akira Kodaka)

Pedestrians in Tokyo's Shinjuku district struggle to hold onto their umbrellas.

(Photo by Kei Higuchi)

The Tama River, which later overflowed, is seen with a much higher water level than usual in Kawasaki, south of Tokyo.

(Photo by Akira Kodaka)

The Shinjuku Station in Tokyo is nearly deserted as Typhoon Hagibis approaches.

(Photo by Hiroyuki Yamamoto)

Stranded foreign travelers wait at Haneda Airport in Tokyo after all flights were canceled.

Oct. 13

 

(Photo by Akira Kodaka)

The city of Nagano in central Japan is seen flooded after the Chikuma River's levee broke.

  © Kyodo

Rescuers save families stranded in their homes in Saitama Prefecture.

  © Kyodo

Apple trees in Nagano submerge into the Chikuma River after it flooded.

  © Kyodo

A man wades through a street in the city of Nagaoka in Niigata Prefecture.

(Photo by Akira Kodaka)

Shinkansen bullet trains are submerged at their base in the city of Akanuma in Nagano Prefecture, central Japan, after the Chikuma River overflowed because of Typhoon Hagibis.

(Photo by Yuki Nakao)

Japanese rugby players, before their game against Scotland in Yokohama, give a moment of silence for the typhoon's casualties.

  © Kyodo

Women in Nagano at an evacuation shelter. They said they were "thankful" for receiving warm meal.

  © Kyodo

The Canadian rugby team helps cleanup efforts in the city of Kamaishi in Iwate Prefecture after their match in the Rugby World Cup was canceled because of the typhoon.

  © Kyodo

A collapsed bridge connecting a railway in the city of Ueda in Nagano Prefecture.

Oct. 14

  © Kyodo

A man visits his relatives' house in Nagano after it was damaged when the Chikuma River flooded.

Oct. 15

(Photo by Hiroyuki Yamamoto)

People walk past downed trees and power lines in the city of Nagano, which was hit hard by Typhoon Hagibis.

(Photo by Hiroyuki Yamamoto)

A gymnasium in the city of Nagano is inundated with debris from the storm.

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