ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronEye IconIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailMenu BurgerPositive ArrowIcon PrintIcon SearchSite TitleTitle ChevronIcon Twitter
Natural disasters

One week later: The scars of Typhoon Hagibis, in pictures

79 dead, 10 missing, trains limited and rice paddies sunk in Japan

Typhoon trash gathered at a temporary site in Marumori, Miyagi Prefecture. (Photo by Konosuke Urata)

TOKYO -- One week after Typhoon Hagibis tore through Japan, the scars are undeniable. From the roughly 4,600 people still living in shelters to the damaged rice paddies in the north, the country faces a long and arduous path back to normalcy.

As of Saturday, 79 people have died and 10 remain missing. Approximately 45,000 homes have been submerged, according to the government. While the water outage has mostly been lifted, some 80,000 homes still have no running water.

On 71 rivers across the country, dikes have collapsed in 130 places.

The Hokuriku shinkansen bullet train will not return to full capacity during 2019, after floods made multiple carriages unusable, the train's operator told Nikkei.

The damage to agriculture is severe as well. The Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries says more than 2,000 patches of agricultural land across 34 prefectures has been ruined, affecting rice, apples, strawberries and cattle.

Rice paddies sunk in mud (not sunken) after a nearby river overflowed in Marumori, Miyagi Prefecture. The damaged occurred just before harvest. (Photo by Konosuke Urata)
A residential district in Marumori, Miyagi Prefecture, remains flooded from a nearby river that breached its banks. (Photo by Konosuke Urata)
People receive help at an evacuation shelter in Marumori, Miyagi Prefecture. (Photo by Kai Fujii)
An excavator removes trees that were swept down the Gofukuya River in Marumori, Miyagi Prefecture. (Photo by Konosuke Urata)
Members of Japan's Self-Defense Forces observe the damage in Miyamori, Miyagi Prefecture.   © Kyodo
A road in a residential neighborhood in Miyamori, Miyagi Prefecture, remains submerged in water. (Photo by Konosuke Urata)
People clean a house that was damaged by flooding in Nagano City, Nagano Prefecture.   © Kyodo

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Get Unlimited access

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends October 31st

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to the Nikkei Asian Review has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media