ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronEye IconIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailMenu BurgerPositive ArrowIcon PrintIcon SearchSite TitleTitle ChevronIcon Twitter
Japan immigration

Survey in Japan looks to assess outlook for foreign engineers

Government hopes to lure techies from abroad as domestic talent pool dries up

Japan's shrinking workforce is forcing the country to look beyond its borders for system engineers and programmers.   © Reuters

TOKYO -- As Japan faces a looming shortage of system engineers and programmers, the government will survey engineers already in the country and companies to find out how to attract more tech talent, Nikkei recently learned.

The survey by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare is intended to assess the needs of companies and engineers as competition to lure talented engineers heats up worldwide. The ministry also hopes to connect companies with engineers.

There are about 52,000 foreigners working for information technology companies in Japan. This will be the first nationwide survey of its kind.

Japan is expected to experience an acute shortage of engineers in the coming years as the population ages and Japanese talent becomes increasingly scarce. As demand for engineers grows, attractive working conditions will be key to bringing foreign workers to the country.

The ministry plans to launch the survey by summer and compile a report by the end of this fiscal year. The survey will cover about 2,500 companies and roughly 8,000 foreign engineers in Japan.

For companies, the survey will inquire about the needs of foreign engineers, Japanese language proficiency requirements and employment histories. Foreign engineers will be queried about wages and compensation, working hours and other conditions, along with their attitudes about working in Japan.

The ministry will also survey the skills and working conditions of engineers in India, Vietnam, China and other countries, as well as find out about their willingness to work in Japan. In addition, pay and working conditions will be assessed in the U.S. and Canada, two countries that accept large numbers of foreign engineers.

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Get Unlimited access

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends June 30th

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to the Nikkei Asian Review has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media