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Trade war

US-China trade talks to resume in week 2 of October, Beijing says

Liu He to visit Washington amid reprieve from Trump tariffs

Top Chinese trade negotiator Liu He, right, speaks with American counterpart Robert Lighthizer at a meeting in Beijing in February.   © AP

BEIJING -- Chinese and American top trade negotiators will meet in Washington during the second week of October, a senior commerce official here said Sunday, restarting talks last convened in July.

"We hope for both sides to stand from a position of equality and mutual respect, to face the same direction, and be considerate of each other's concerns," Vice Commerce Minister Wang Shouwen told reporters.

It was the first time a Chinese official had given a specific timetable for a ministerial-level meeting. Vice Premier Liu He, China's top trade negotiator, will lead the delegation to the U.S.

"Differences should be overcome by negotiations from calm and rational attitudes, and we should seek solutions that will benefit both sides," Wang said.

Wang spoke at a news conference on the upcoming 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China. Out of deference to the holiday, U.S. President Donald Trump had delayed tariffs on $250 billion of Chinese goods from Tuesday to Oct. 15.

Beijing has moved to increase imports of American soybeans, pork and other farm products. Even with both parties signaling a willingness to break the deadlock, significant gaps remain on such structural issues as financial subsidies for Chinese state-owned enterprises.

Hu Xijin, the closely followed editor-in-chief of the Communist Party-affiliated Global times, tweeted Saturday that he saw little anxiety over U.S.-China trade on a trip to Hangzhou.

"In my talks with local entrepreneurs, I didn't feel they are [in a] panic over the trade war," Hu wrote, adding that they were "effectively exploring" international markets other than the U.S.

Trump said last week that a trade deal between the two countries "could happen sooner than you think."

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