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An empty guard post outside former Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew's Oxley Road residence in Singapore   © Reuters
Tea Leaves

Singaporeans reveal a pent-up desire for debate on social issues

Prime minister's family feud goes viral, provides public a rare chance to vent

PETER GUEST | Singapore

One of the strangest things I have been accused of this year is the vicarious murder of two dozen chickens. It was February, and the Singaporean papers were a few weeks into a long-running drama that would only peter out in late March, and which was by then the basis of animated monologues from Singapore's frank and imaginative cabbies.

In January, the government had declared that flocks of semi-wild chickens roaming near housing estates in Sin Ming were a potential health hazard, and had them removed. That, I was told, was just the cover story. In truth, the birds' fate was a symptom of Singapore's rush to build condos for ang mo, or white men, like me, whose vision of gentrification had no place for livestock. Later, I would hear that the chicken slaughter was in fact a sign that the technocrats that run this gleaming city have no respect for the mythical "kampung days" when people lived in idyllic villages. In one elaborate work of fiction, the chickens had gone into cooking pots across the Malaysian border.

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