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Business

Tokyo restaurant invites guests to a digital world

Up to 16 guests per evening can experience unique blending of food and space

Projected images are a key feature of Tree by Naked Yoyogi Park.

TOKYO -- A visual creator group will soon open a new type of restaurant near Yoyogi Park in Tokyo's Shibuya Ward.

Tree by Naked Yoyogi Park, slated to open on July 28, incorporates projection mapping and virtual reality for the entire presentation of the three-story building including a basement.

Ryotaro Muramatsu, who heads Tokyo-based creator group Naked, aims to make the place an experience-based restaurant where guests can enjoy harmony of food and visual presentation.

The restaurant will be open in the evening only, with two sittings per evening starting at 6 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. For each slot, the facility will be able to entertain up to eight guests, who will be guided to move from one floor to another in the building while enjoying a Western-style course meal -- desserts will be served on the second floor, for example.

While touring the building, guests will be welcomed with different tastes of space presentation on each floor, which will be based on an overall theme of the "scenes of life" of a tree.

A six-course meal will cost 15,000 yen ($133) per person excluding tax.

For creating the digitally-rendered natural world, the Space Player projector by Panasonic plays an essential role. The dual-function device can spotlight an object while projecting images around it. Unlike typical projectors, the equipment, in the form of spotlight, can be attached to the ceiling, where it can operate without interrupting the atmosphere of the room.

During dinner, images are projected on the food itself to enhance the blending of dishes with visual presentation.

In addition to 28 units of Space Player, the Japanese electronics maker also provides 60 Tolso light-emitting diode spotlights for the restaurant.

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