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Life

How Myanmar's post-coup violence is transforming a generation

Bloodshed leads to soul-searching in majority Burman community

Cho, a Yangon-based worker for female empowerment, holds a poster at an anti-coup protest in Myanmar. Before the violence of the coup, she says, "we never realized how badly the soldiers were behaving" in other parts of the country. (Courtesy of Cho)

YANGON -- The arson attacks and evening raids by soldiers and police that followed Myanmar's Feb. 1 coup gave 25-year-old Cho a glimpse of what life must be like in parts of the country where the military has waged war for decades.

"Since the coup, whenever I meet up with friends, we talked about ... how we never realized how badly the soldiers were behaving in these areas," said Cho, a Yangon-based worker for female empowerment, noting how ashamed she feels now about her past ignorance.

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