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Life

In Kashmir, Tibetan food nourishes refugee culture

Growing popularity among locals reflects exiles’ gradual assimilation

SRINAGAR, India -- On Srinagar’s Boulevard Road, visitors heading for the shore of the city’s scenic Dal Lake could easily miss Lhasa, but for the pagoda-style roof and wooden facade that mark its Tibetan heritage. Inside, Chinese paper lanterns cast a red gleam over framed portraits of the Tibetan city from which this popular restaurant gets its name.

The Tibetan exterior and decoration is no accident. When Abdul Rehman Zareif opened Lhasa in 1976, his motivation was partly to help to preserve the culture of Tibet, which he had been forced to flee after a failed uprising against Chinese rule in 1959.

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