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In pictures: Recovering from Typhoon Goni in Catanduanes

Families hardest hit are trying to beat hunger and rebuild lives

An aerial shot over Catanduanes shows the damage caused by Super Typhoon Goni (known locally as Rolly) six weeks after it struck on Nov. 1. Catanduanes is located in the Bicol region of Luzon in the Philippines.   © WFP Philippines/Angelo Mendoza

CATANDUANES ISLAND, Philippines -- Holiday cheer has been slow to come to the Philippine island of Catanduanes, which was devastated by Typhoon Goni (known locally as Rolly) on Nov. 1, 2020.

Reconstruction is gradually taking place for the island's population of about 260,000 people. As the epicenter of the typhoon, 90% of all the island's houses were damaged, and most of them have yet to be repaired. At least 25 people died and nearly 400 were injured, while six people remain missing in the aftermath of the typhoon. With homes, properties and livelihoods lost, many families are still living in evacuation centers, all in need of food, shelter and income support.

Among those helping, the United Nations World Food Program, with contribution from the Australian government, has provided cash assistance to 12,000 of the most vulnerable. But to get back on their feet, communities on Catanduanes need more support.

These photos were taken on Dec. 15-17.

Acres of rice fields on Catanduanes still stand submerged in rainwater from the typhoon.   © WFP Philippines/Angelo Mendoza

 

Nelly Tomon, 72, strips abaca, banana-tree fiber, to make a living. Since the storm, she and her family have been forced to rely on aid to survive.   © WFP Philippines/Angelo Mendoza

 

Tomon registers for a cash-assistance program provided by the World Food Program of 2,500 Philippine pesos ($52) per person. Working with the local government in Catanduanes with contribution from the Australian government, WFP has focused on the most vulnerable individuals, including single mothers, girls and people with disabilities.   © WFP Philippines/Angelo Mendoza

 

A WFP member checks people’s temperature as they line up to register for cash assistance. The Philippines is still fighting the COVID-19 pandemic.   © WFP Philippines/Angelo Mendoza

 

Edwina Tatel, 30, pregnant with her second child, rests in her home in San Miguel, Catanduanes. Edwina lives with her parents, sister-in-law, and her 3-year-old son in a small house, which was damaged in the typhoon. They are among families receiving WFP assistance.   © WFP Philippines/Angelo Mendoza

 

Maria Torrente, 51, Is another resident of Catanduanes who lost her home when Typhoon Goni hit. Along with her house, her livelihood, a little canteen, was also destroyed.   © WFP Philippines/Angelo Mendoza

 

WFP’s emergency response program in Catanduanes pays special attention to 12,000 of the most vulnerable people. The U.N. in the Philippines has launched a $52.6 million appeal in the region to provide a range of services to 280,000 people. By Dec. 22, only 25% of the appeal had been met.   © WFP Philippines/Angelo Mendoza

 

Tomon walks down a muddy path near her home, in one of the most remote villages in the island. The location, far from the main town of Virac, has added more challenges for her and her family as they recover from damage caused by the typhoon and subsequent storms.     © WFP Philippines/Angelo Mendoza

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