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Opinion

Afghanistan shows the limits of China's Belt and Road

Despite its engagement with the Taliban, Beijing is unable to reach its goals

| Afghanistan
Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, right, stands next to Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar, acting deputy prime minister of the Afghan Taliban's caretaker government, in Kabul on Mar. 24: There is little trust in China on the Taliban side.   © Xinhua/AP

Raffaello Pantucci is a senior fellow at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies in Singapore and author of "Sinostan: China's Inadvertent Empire." (Oxford University Press)

A decade ago, Peking University international studies professor Wang Jisi set the conceptual foundation for what would become the Belt and Road Initiative with an essay called "Marching Westwards."

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