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Opinion

Widodo's battle with radical Islam hangs in balance

Indonesian president pursues two-pronged approach amid political shifts

| Indonesia
Indonesian President Joko Widodo meets citizens at the Indonesian embassy in Singapore on Sept. 6.   © Reuters

Radical Muslim organizations alleging blasphemy against Jakarta's Christian governor Basuki Purnama caught Indonesian President Joko Widodo off guard last year, and seemed for a while to threaten his presidency. Mass rallies over several months helped to inflict electoral defeat on Purnama, who was convicted in court and is now serving two years in prison.

Distancing himself from Purnama, a former political ally, Widodo has now begun to tackle the perceived threat from radical Islam. His approach looks like a two-pronged strategy. The first element is to curtail radical Muslim organizations' freedom of action. The second is to reinforce the status and prestige of Pancasila, the tolerant and inclusive Indonesian state ideology.

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