ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailPositive ArrowIcon PrintIcon Twitter
International relations

Abe, Turnbull view Japanese special forces in action

Two leaders reaffirm solidarity against North Korean threat

Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, center, inspects surface-to-air missiles at Camp Narashino with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

TOKYO -- Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull on Thursday viewed special operations exercises at an army camp near Tokyo, demonstrating his country's solidarity with Japan regarding the North Korean crisis. 

Turnbull toured Camp Narashino, east of Tokyo, with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. The military installation is home to the special operations unit of Japan's Ground Self-Defense Force, the nation's only such unit.

The unit, comprising some 300 soldiers, is charged with conducting counterterrorism and counterinsurgency operations and has recently been assigned the role of rescuing Japanese nationals residing abroad.

It was the first time that a foreign leader was allowed to view the unit.

During the tour, Turnbull and Abe also visited an anti-missile battery operated by the Air-Self Defense Force. The battery is in place to defend Tokyo against possible North Korean ballistic missile attacks.

The leaders were then briefed about Bushmaster armored vehicle carriers that Japan recently purchased from Australia.

The visit took place ahead of summit talks scheduled for later in the day. The leaders are expected to reaffirm their resolve to make North Korea end its nuclear weapons program and acknowledge their commitment to expanding their security partnership.

Japan sees Australia as a "semi-ally," a country with which it does not actually have a formal treaty. The two leaders are expected to confirm their vision of a free and open Indo-Pacific region that U.S. President Donald Trump advocates.

(Nikkei)

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 1 month for $0.99

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends January 31st

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to Nikkei Asia has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media

Nikkei Asian Review, now known as Nikkei Asia, will be the voice of the Asian Century.

Celebrate our next chapter
Free access for everyone - Sep. 30

Find out more