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Politics

China, South Korea media critical of Japan's new defense chief

TOKYO -- Chinese and South Korean media outlets have been voicing alarm over newly appointed Japanese Defense Minister Tomomi Inada.

State-run China Central Television introduced Inada as a "right-wing female politician" in subtitles during a news program covering Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's recent cabinet reshuffle. The broadcaster said the new cabinet tilts stronger to the right.

The Global Times, a newspaper affiliated with the People's Daily, the mouthpiece of the Chinese Communist Party, noted in an online article how Inada visits the Yasukuni Shrine every year during the anniversary marking the end of World War II and on other occasions. The shrine is controversial because it honors Japan's war dead, including convicted war criminals.

Government-run news agency Xinhua reports that top Japanese ministers have retained their posts, and that strong supporters of Abe number heavily among cabinet newcomers.

In South Korea, the Yonhap News Agency referred to both Inada and Hirokazu Matsuno, the new education minister, as "hard right" politicians that engage in historical revisionism. Inada in particular has questioned the legal validity of the rulings handed down by the International Military Tribunal for the Far East in Tokyo following World War II, Yonhap added.

The news service also said that Abe's decision to retain top officials such as Finance Minister Taro Aso could be interpreted as the Japanese prime minister looking to fortify a stable administrative framework.

(Nikkei)

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