ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronEye IconIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailPositive ArrowIcon PrintSite TitleTitle ChevronIcon Twitter
Politics

China may add Xi imprint to party charter

Amendment likely at party congress in October

Bookstores in China carry many works on Xi Jinping's thoughts.

BEIJING -- The Chinese Communist Party will revise its constitution at next month's National Congress, but it is still unclear whether President Xi Jinping's name will be attached to the changes, an honor that would elevate him above his recent predecessors.

The ruling Politburo discussed the matter and confirmed the direction Monday, the official Xinhua news agency reported.

Party leader and President Xi's thoughts and ideals, set forth in his first five-year term, are summed up in what is called "the four comprehensives" -- that China should make comprehensive efforts to achieve a moderately prosperous society by 2020, advance reform and strengthen rule of law and party discipline. These align with Xi's anti-corruption campaign and efforts to eliminate poverty.

The Politburo stressed that "the amendments should include the key theories and strategic thoughts" presented by a report delivered at the party's upcoming National Congress, according to Xinhua.

Mao Zedong Thought and Deng Xiaoping Theory are officially enshrined in the party's charter. But Xi's immediate predecessors had their doctrines incorporated without their names attached. Jiang Zemin's "Three Represents" thought, which embraced private entrepreneurs, and Hu Jintao's economic doctrine of "scientific development" are both included.

If Xi succeeds in crowning his ideas with his name attached, that would be an affirmation of his status as among China's most powerful rulers.

The content of the Politburo meeting will be confirmed at the Central Committee general meeting ahead of the party congress, which opens Oct. 18, Xinhua said. The congress takes place every five years.

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 1 month for $0.99

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends July 31st

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to the Nikkei Asian Review has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media