ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailPositive ArrowIcon PrintIcon Twitter
Politics

China's Xi, in congress speech, pledges to squash separatism

President vows to prevent Taiwan independence, boost Beijing's naval power

YASUO AWAI and KENSAKU IHARA, Nikkei staff writers | China

BEIJING -- President Xi Jinping sent a blunt message to independence movements in Taiwan and Hong Kong during his keynote speech to the Communist Party National Congress on Wednesday, vowing never to let China be divided again.

The "historical tragedy of national division" will not reoccur, pledged Xi, who also holds the title of Communist Party general secretary.

"We have the resolve, the confidence, and the ability to defeat separatist attempts for 'Taiwan independence' in any form," he said, taking a jab at Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen, who rejects unification. Xi also said that a prerequisite for any talks would be Taiwan's recognition of the so-called 1992 Consensus, in which both parties verbally agreed to the principle that there is only one China.

Taiwan's Mainland Affairs Council responded Wednesday that the "One China" principle unilaterally created by Beijing cannot win the support of the Taiwanese public.

Xi also noted the end of the Umbrella Movement to democratize Hong Kong and other protests, saying Beijing holds the right to control the former British territory and Macau because the "one country, two systems" principle is founded on the condition of China's sovereignty over the cities.

"We will remain committed to the policy for the Hong Kong people to govern Hong Kong ... with patriots playing the principal role," Xi added, suggesting that Beijing will allow no pro-independence politicians to take office.

China also will accelerate efforts to become a naval power, said Xi, who praised the country's construction of man-made islands in the South China Sea. China will take a hard diplomatic line on issues in the region, he signaled.

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 1 month for $0.99

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends January 31st

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to Nikkei Asia has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media

Nikkei Asian Review, now known as Nikkei Asia, will be the voice of the Asian Century.

Celebrate our next chapter
Free access for everyone - Sep. 30

Find out more