ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronEye IconIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailPositive ArrowIcon PrintTitle ChevronIcon Twitter
G-20 summit Osaka

French president calls for council to help officials regulate AI

'Limits on innovation' needed to protect society, says Macron

French President Emmanuel Macron warned of the dangers of uncontrolled AI development. 

TOKYO -- French President Emmanuel Macron has called for the creation of a board of international experts to advise governments on how to regulate the development of artificial intelligence amid mounting concern that the technology could outstrip human control unless reined in.

"The development of AI should rely on international coordination to bring about positive innovation,"said Macron on Thursday in Tokyo at an event jointly organized by the Nikkei and the French embassy. Macron is visiting Japan, for the first time as president, to attend the G-20 summit that begins in Osaka on Friday.

Guidance from an international group of independent experts would allow for ethical reflection about AI development and be beneficial for government policymaking, he said. AI "should not be left only to private actors," he said, because it could have "massive consequences" for everyday life and the use of personal data. 

"Sometimes we will need to set limits to innovation and give rules so that community can be preserved," Macron added.

France will chair a G-7 summit to be held in August in the coastal resort town of Biarritz. Macron said the meeting will focus on the themes of globalization and inequality, AI and other digital technology, and climate change and biodiversity. "We are facing three transformations or crises," Macron said. "It is not only the government... but every person and every company needs to change their habits."

Digital technology, including AI, can "bring tremendous opportunities"but at the same time "it can destabilize our society," Macron said. France in 2018 announced a national strategy to invest 1.5 billion euros ($1.7 billion) in AI by 2022.

Paris seeks to attract more top researchers in a bid to compete with the U.S. and China, the current global leaders in the sector. Japan’s Fujitsu, whose chairman also made a speech at Thursday's event, has already set up a new AI center in France.

Macron said Japan and France can invest and work together on digital development. “Our two countries need to continue investing into applied research to be at the forefront of leadership in digital innovation," he said. 

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 1 month for $0.99

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends October 31st

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to Nikkei Asia has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media

Nikkei Asian Review, now known as Nikkei Asia, will be the voice of the Asian Century.

Celebrate our next chapter
Free access for everyone - Sep. 30

Find out more