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G-20 summit Osaka

Japan hosts G-20 leaders with a feast of Tajima beef and local wine

Trump calls Osaka 'beautiful' at banquet in castle garden

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe addresses guests at the Group of 20 leaders' dinner June 28 in Osaka, Japan.

OSAKA -- Japan is taking every opportunity at the Group of 20 summit here to promote regional products and traditional culture to the visiting leaders from around the world.

The leaders' dinner Friday took place at Osaka Castle, where attendees were greeted by Osaka Prefecture Gov. Hirofumi Yoshimura and Osaka Mayor Ichiro Matsui.

"The mayor and I shook hands with Mr. Trump," Yoshimura told reporters after the event. "He said, 'The city of Osaka is beautiful.'"

The dinner menu featured prized Tajima beef and showcased foods from areas struck by the March 2011 earthquake, such as a 16-grain rice dish made with grains and maitake mushrooms from Iwate Prefecture. Similarly, rice from Fukushima Prefecture and wine from Niigata Prefecture featured in that day's working lunch.

Tokyo hopes that this will help sway countries to lift imports on restrictions of food from the affected areas, which many feared had been tainted by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.

The meals also highlighted ingredients from the Kansai region around Osaka, such as chicken from Hyogo Prefecture and sparkling wine produced in Osaka Prefecture.

Special meals were prepared for vegetarians -- including Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi -- and those with other dietary restrictions. Traditional sweets arranged to look like a Japanese garden were on offer in the break area for leaders and officials.

The leaders' dinner was accompanied by performances by Mansai Nomura, a performer of traditional kyogen comic theater; pianist Nobuyuki Tsujii; and opera singer Michie Nakamaru.

During the summit itself, leaders' spouses had a welcome lunch and tea at the Tofukuji temple in Kyoto. A kabuki performance is on the agenda for Saturday.

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