ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronEye IconIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailPositive ArrowIcon PrintTitle ChevronIcon Twitter
International relations

Chinese foreign minister to visit Japan on Tuesday

Wang to meet counterpart Motegi, and possibly PM Suga, to discuss business travel

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi will be the first senior Chinese official to visit Japan since the pandemic began.   © Reuters

TOKYO (Kyodo) -- Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi will visit Japan from Tuesday as the neighboring countries look to put their political differences aside to revive their coronavirus-hit economies by resuming business travel.

"There are various matters of concern between Japan and China and it is important that we resolve them one by one through high-level meetings," Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi, who announced Wang's visit, told a press conference on Friday.

Wang, also a state councilor, will be the highest-ranking official from Beijing to visit Japan since its top diplomat Yang Jiechi came to Tokyo in late February.

In addition to talks with Motegi on Tuesday, Wang is expected to meet with Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga during his two-day trip, according to Japanese officials.

"We had the most number of tourists and visitors from China before the outbreak of the novel coronavirus virus. I want to have thorough discussions about ways to resume travel while taking infection prevention measures," Motegi said.

The rescheduling of a state visit by Chinese President Xi Jinping to Japan is unlikely to be discussed in the talks with Wang because "now is a time to prioritize measures against the novel coronavirus," Motegi said.

Xi's first state visit to Japan since he became president in 2013 was originally planned for around spring this year but was put off due to the pandemic.

Among major political issues, Japan has repeatedly expressed concerns about and opposition to China's attempts to undermine Tokyo's control of the Senkaku Islands in the East China Sea and its aggressive posturing in the South China Sea.

But economically, Japan hopes to resume exchanges with China, its biggest trading partner. The two countries have been in talks since July to restart reciprocal short- and long-term business trips.

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 1 month for $0.99

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends October 31st

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to Nikkei Asia has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media

Nikkei Asian Review, now known as Nikkei Asia, will be the voice of the Asian Century.

Celebrate our next chapter
Free access for everyone - Sep. 30

Find out more