ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailPositive ArrowIcon PrintIcon Twitter
International relations

G-20 agrees not to ease fiscal stimulus to keep up recoveries

US raises hopes of global tax rules for Google, Amazon and Facebook

U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen tells her G-20 counterparts that Washington has dropped the previous administration's proposal to let some companies opt out of global digital tax rules.   © Reuters

ROME/BRUSSELS (Reuters) -- The world's financial leaders agreed on Friday to maintain expansionary policies to help economies survive the effects of COVID-19 and committed to a more multilateral approach to the twin coronavirus and economic crises.

The Italian presidency of the G-20, a group of the world's top economies, said the gathering of finance chiefs had pledged to work more closely to accelerate a still fragile and uneven recovery.

"We agreed that any premature withdrawal of fiscal and monetary support should be avoided," Daniele Franco, Italy's finance minister, told a news conference after the video-linked meeting held by the G-20 finance ministers and central bankers.

The United States is readying $1.9 trillion in fiscal stimulus and the European Union has already put together more than 3 trillion euros ($3.63 trillion) to keep its economies through lockdowns.

But despite the large sums, problems with the global rollout of vaccines and the emergence of new coronavirus variants mean the future path of the recovery remains uncertain.

The G-20 is "committed to scaling up international coordination to tackle current global challenges by adopting a stronger multilateral approach and focusing on a set of core priorities," the Italian presidency said in a statement.

The meeting was the first since Joe Biden -- who pledged to rebuild U.S. cooperation in international bodies -- became U.S. president, and significant progress appeared to have been made on the thorny issue of taxation of multinational companies, particularly web giants like Google, Amazon and Facebook.

U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen told the G-20 Washington had dropped the Trump administration's proposal to let some companies opt out of new global digital tax rules, raising hopes for an agreement by summer.

The move was hailed as a major breakthrough by Germany's Finance Minister Olaf Scholz and his French counterpart Bruno Le Maire.

Scholz said Yellen told the G-20 officials that Washington also planned to reform U.S. minimum tax regulations in line with an OECD proposal for a global effective minimum tax.

"This is a giant step forward," Scholz said.

Italy's Franco said the new U.S. stance should pave the way to an overarching deal on taxation of multinationals at a G-20 meeting of finance chiefs in Venice in July.

The G-20 also discussed how to help the world's poorest countries, whose economies are being disproportionately hit by the crisis.

On this front there was broad support for boosting the capital of the International Monetary Fund to help it provide more loans, but no concrete numbers were proposed.

To give itself more firepower, the Fund proposed last year to increase its war chest by $500 billion in the IMF's own currency called the Special Drawing Rights (SDR), but the idea was blocked by Trump.

"There was no discussion on specific amounts of SDRs," Franco said, adding that the issue would be looked at again on the basis of a proposal prepared by the IMF for April.

While the IMF sees the U.S. economy returning to precrisis levels at the end of this year, it may take Europe until the middle of 2022 to reach that point.

The recovery is fragile elsewhere too. Factory activity in China grew at the slowest pace in five months in January, and in Japan fourth quarter growth slowed from the previous quarter.

Some countries had expressed hopes the G-20 may extend a suspension of debt servicing costs for the poorest countries beyond June, but no decision was taken.

The issue will be discussed at the next meeting, Franco said.

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 1 month for $0.99

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends January 31st

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to Nikkei Asia has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media

Nikkei Asian Review, now known as Nikkei Asia, will be the voice of the Asian Century.

Celebrate our next chapter
Free access for everyone - Sep. 30

Find out more