ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronEye IconIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailPositive ArrowIcon PrintTitle ChevronIcon Twitter
International relations

TPP's remaining members ease path for trade deal

Approval by countries with majority of GDP no longer required to take effect

The rules hammered in the TPP-11 free trade agreement signed on March 8 are at risk of not keeping pace with-fast moving developments in worlds of technology and business.

TOKYO -- The 11-member Trans-Pacific Partnership trade pact has looser provisions for full implementation than in the original version, according to the final text released Wednesday.

For the so-called TPP-11 to go into force, at least six countries, or half the signatories, whichever is fewer, would need to ratify the document. The deal takes effect 60 days after that point.

The original TPP, which included the U.S., required ratifications from six countries accounting for 85% or more of the combined gross domestic product of the 12 members. But after President Donald Trump withdrew the U.S. from the TPP last year, the remaining members canceled the GDP prerequisite. America accounted for more than 60% of the total economic output.

The 11 nations are to sign the pact in Santiago, Chile, on March 8. Officially renamed the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, the seven-article deal suspends 22 items that were incorporated in the previous version. Half of the frozen provisions involve intellectual property issues, such as copyrights and patents.

The TPP-11 also includes a clause calling for a review of the agreement "if the entry into force of the [original] TPP is imminent or if the TPP is unlikely to enter into force."

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 1 month for $0.99

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends October 31st

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to Nikkei Asia has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media

Nikkei Asian Review, now known as Nikkei Asia, will be the voice of the Asian Century.

Celebrate our next chapter
Free access for everyone - Sep. 30

Find out more