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International relations

Taiwan protests to JAL and ANA for labeling again with China

Japanese carriers use 'Taiwan, China' for mainland website

Japan Airlines and ANA Holdings now refer to "Taiwan, China" on their mainland Chinese websites, following the likes of Lufthansa, Qantas and Singapore Airlines.
Japan Airlines and ANA Holdings now refer to "Taiwan, China" on their mainland Chinese websites, following the likes of Lufthansa, Qantas and Singapore Airlines.

TAIPEI -- Taiwan has objected to moves by Japan Airlines and ANA Holdings to label the self-governing island as part of China on their websites in response to demands from Beijing.

As of Monday, the two Japanese carriers had switched to "Taiwan, China" on their sites for customers from the mainland and Hong Kong while calling the island simply "Taiwan" elsewhere. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs here lodged a strong protest with Tokyo via Taiwan's de facto embassy in Japan on Monday, decrying what it called Beijing's high-handed pressure on Taipei.

Earlier this month, JAL and ANA had temporarily tagged Taiwan together with China on their online route maps. They removed the references, blaming a third-party map site. Now they have re-listed in separate ways according to the user's region.

China regards Taiwan as a wayward province.

Many carriers have tried sidestepping the sensitive issue of Taiwan's status, through such means as keeping it ambiguous, amid competing demands from Taipei and Beijing. The Civil Aviation Administration of China in April ordered dozens of overseas carriers to clearly label Taiwan as part of the mainland or else suffer legal consequences.

The likes of Germany's Lufthansa, Air Canada and Qantas of Australia have complied for fearing of losing business in the massive Chinese market. Singapore Airlines and budget unit Scoot did so on June 12, drawing a protest from the Taiwanese ministry.

The Trump administration has blasted Beijing's demands on private foreign companies as "Orwellian nonsense." It has urged major U.S. carriers United Airlines, American Airlines and Delta Air Lines to ignore the order, the Financial Times reported in early June.

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