ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailPositive ArrowIcon PrintIcon Twitter
Politics

Taiwanese officials in Hong Kong forced to return home

City demands signing document that recognizes 'one China' principle or leave

Taiwanese personnel at the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Hong Kong have been forced to leave the city due to political obstacles the Hong Kong government has set up.   © Reuters

TAIPEI (Kyodo) -- Taiwanese officials of the island's representative office in Hong Kong were forced to return home Sunday after the city government demanded that they sign a document recognizing Beijing's "one China" principle, the island's top agency handling relations with China said.

The Mainland Affairs Council said that the Taiwanese personnel at the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Hong Kong, operated by the council, were forced to leave the city due to "unreasonable political obstacles" the Hong Kong government had set up, adding the council issued "a stern warning and condemnation" to the government.

Taiwan's Central News Agency quoted an anonymous source as saying that seven of the office's eight staff will see their visas expire soon. To have their visas renewed, it was demanded that the staff sign the document or leave the city before Monday.

The council also said the Hong Kong government had begun to make political demands of the representative office since 2018 and the new head of the office, Lu Chang-shui, had not been able to assume his post though he was appointed that year.

The departure of the Taiwanese staff in Hong Kong came after the Macau government announced on Wednesday that it would suspend operations of its representative office in Taiwan.

Macau followed in Hong Kong's footsteps in suspending its representative office in Taiwan on May 18.

Taiwan and mainland China have been governed separately since they split amid civil war in 1949. Beijing has since regarded Taiwan as a renegade province awaiting reunification, by force if necessary.

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 1 month for $0.99

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends July 31st

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to Nikkei Asia has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media

Nikkei Asian Review, now known as Nikkei Asia, will be the voice of the Asian Century.

Celebrate our next chapter
Free access for everyone - Sep. 30

Find out more