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Trump-Kim Summit

Trump-Kim summit to be held on Singapore's Sentosa Island

Businesses milk impending media frenzy with 'commemorative' food and drink

The Capella Hotel on Sentosa Island in Singapore will be conducive to security, located away from major shopping districts.    © Reuters

SINGAPORE -- The June 12 summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un will be held at the five-star Capella Hotel on Singapore's resort island of Sentosa, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders tweeted on Tuesday.

Sentosa is far from Singapore's business and shopping areas, making it ideal in terms of security. U.S. officials who held preliminary talks with their North Korean counterparts in Singapore stayed in a hotel on Sentosa.

The island was designated a "special event area" for the summit, according to a public order issued on Tuesday. Anyone entering the zone between June 10 and June 14 may be subject to security checks.

The 1-sq.-km area around the Shangri-La Hotel, near the main shopping drag of Orchard Road, also is designated a "special event area." The Shangri-La has been the backdrop for many high-level meetings, including the recent Asia Security Summit, also referred to as the Shangri-La Dialogue.

Where the leaders will stay and who will pay North Korea's bills are other areas of speculation. Kim reportedly requested a stay in the Fullerton Hotel, another luxury hotel on the waterfront. A night in Fullerton's presidential suite can cost thousands of dollars.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is seen to stay at Fullerton Hotel,   © Reuters

The International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, which won the Nobel Peace Prize last year, offered to foot North Korea's hotel bills as a "contribution to efforts to prohibit and eliminate nuclear weapons," the body tweeted on Sunday, in a response to a report speculating about Pyongyang's ability to pay for itself in the pricey area.

But it isn't just the high-level officials who will provide a windfall for Singapore's hospitality sector: Journalists from all over the world will converge in Singapore to cover the meeting. Singaporean Defense Minister Ng Eng Hen said on Sunday during a session at the Shangri-La Dialogue that "thousands of journalists" have booked rooms in the city-state.

Restaurants are rushing to cash in on the summit as well. Escobar, named after the infamous Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar, has launched special-edition cocktails and a Summit Burger meal. Mixed in the colors of the U.S. and North Korean flags -- red, blue and white -- the cocktails contain either Korean soju or bourbon.

"We are hoping for a sweet outcome at the end of the summit," said restaurant director Stan Sri Ganesh.

Restaurant Lucha Loco designed a special poster to promote the Trump-Kim summit. 

The Royal Plaza on Scotts hotel debuted a similar campaign with a Trump-Kim Burger and Summit Iced Tea. Its burger is made with minced chicken and kimchi, while the tea has a Korean honey yuzu flavor.

Lucha Loco, a popular Mexican bar, is promoting its Loco Taco Summit with two specially created tacos. Customers also can enter draws to smash custom-made Trump-Kim pinatas.

Like the White House Military Office, the Singapore Mint also is marking the historic moment with commemorative medallions. On Tuesday, it unveiled three designs, made with either nickel-plated zinc (36 Singapore dollars, about $27), fine silver (S$118) or 999.9 fine gold (S$1,380).

"The medallions not only commemorate this momentous step to world peace, but mark Singapore's role as a neutral host, and an economic and security gateway," the mint said on its website.

One side of the coin shows a handshake, an engraving of both countries' flags as well as the location and date of the summit. The other side shows the national flowers of the U.S. and North Korea, a peace dove and the words "World Peace."

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